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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Medical Xpress

00:02 EDT 23rd September 2017 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Medical Xpress" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

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Showing News Articles 1–25 of 42,000+ from Medical Xpress

Friday 22nd September 2017

Study finds public-private partnerships key to making telemedicine sustainable

Proper health care is more difficult in remote parts of India.

Florida to require nursing home generators after Irma deaths

Florida's top health care regulator, in the aftermath of the nursing home deaths that followed Hurricane Irma, says the state will "aggressively" enforce new rules that require nursing homes and assisted living facilities to have generators.

Leaders highlight early education for drug misuse prevention

More than 100 children in New Hampshire's largest city have witnessed an adult overdose in their home since 2016. Now, a police program that officials hope will be replicated elsewhere is working to prevent kids from meeting the same fate.

Emergency contraception not as accessible as it should be, says study

Efforts to remove barriers to accessing emergency contraception (EC) scored victories in 2013, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration removed age restrictions on over-the-counter sales of the levonogestrel drug Plan B. But those who need EC can still encounter cost and availability barriers.

New gene delivery approach could allow long-term persistence in proliferating cells

Researchers added a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) to a conventional adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector used for gene transfer, and the modified vectors were able to establish colonies and maintain long-term transgene expression in HeLa cells, as reported in Human Gene Therapy.

No proven way to prevent celiac disease

Dear Mayo Clinic: Is there anything I can do now to prevent my 1-year-old from getting celiac disease?

Alcohol aids cerebellar deficit from movement disorder

(HealthDay)—Alcohol improves cerebellar-learning deficit in the movement disorder myoclonus-dystonia, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in the Annals of Neurology.

Oral beats topical isotretinoin for treatment of warts

(HealthDay)—Oral isotretinoin shows a better and earlier response than topical isotretinoin for the treatment of plane warts, according to a small study published online Sept. 13 in the International Journal of Dermatology.

Discovery of a new genetic syndrome that predisposes the body to cancer

A new syndrome caused by biallelic mutations in the FANCM gene predisposes the body to the appearance of tumours and causes rejection to chemotherapy treatments. Contrary to what scientists believed, the gene does not cause Fanconi anaemia. Researchers recommend modifying the clinical monitoring of patients with these mutations.

Cryolipolysis with colder temp, shorter time safe, effective

(HealthDay)—Cryolipolysis with colder temperature and reduced treatment time is safe and effective for noninvasive reduction of submental fat, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

Obesity is about much more than an unhealthy lifestyle

Despite an abundance of evidence illustrating that weight gain is caused by a complex cocktail of factors, obesity is often solely attributed to poor individual lifestyle choices – such as diet and exercise.

Greece makes measles vaccination appeal amid European spike

Health authorities in Greece have issued a public appeal to participate in vaccination and booster shot programs following a spike in measles cases in the country amid an outbreak in Europe.

Exergames: good for play time, but should not replace physical education

More and more young Australians are playing video games during their leisure time. Fortunately, video game manufacturers have introduced "exergames" in an effort to make this typically sedentary activity more physically engaging. These "active" video game consoles, like the Nintendo Wii, offer gamers sporting experiences that mimic the real game or sport.

White supremacy—the dark side of eugenics

Whenever I work on a new edition of my human genetics textbook and reach the section on eugenics, at the end of an evolution chapter, I'm relieved that it's history. But this summer, as I wrapped up the 12th edition, the eugenics coverage took on a frightening new reality.

Link between sexually transmitted virus and underweight babies

Women carrying the sexually transmitted HPV infection prior to two years of giving birth are 50 per cent more likely to have a tiny baby, new research shows.

Breaking memory circuits with marijuana

Paranoia. Munchies. Giggles. Sleepiness. Memory loss. Although the effects of cannabinoids–the active components of marijuana–are familiar to many, their neurobiological substrates are poorly characterized. Perhaps the effect of greatest interest to both neuroscientists and to cannabis users hoping to preserve their cognitive function, is short-term memory impairment that often accompanies mar...

When neurogenesis goes wrong

Neurogenesis is a complex biological process by which neurons are generated from neural stem cells and progenitor cells. Indeed, the discovery of a dynamic neurogenesis in the adult brain (in both humans and animals) was a kind of extraordinary revelation. In fact, contrary to common popular belief, neurogenesis continuously occurs in specific regions in the adult brain, such as in the hippocampus...

What are mitochondria and how did we come to have them?

We've probably all heard of mitochondria, and we may even remember learning in school that they are the "powerhouses of the cell" – but what does that actually mean, and how did they evolve? To answer this question, we have to go back about two billion years to a time when none of the complexity of life as we see it today existed.

A human bi-specific antibody against Zika virus with high therapeutic potential

The journal Cell today published data with a bi-specific antibody against Zika virus infection. The article is titled "A Human Bi-specific Antibody against Zika Virus with High Therapeutic Potential."

Pregnant women are not getting enough omega-3

The first ever study on the intakes of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in pregnant women in New Zealand, has found only 30 per cent are getting the recommended daily amount.

Exercise can make cells healthier, promoting longer life, study finds

Whether it's running, walking, cycling, swimming or rowing, it's been well-known since ancient times that doing some form of aerobic exercise is essential to good health and well-being. You can lose weight, sleep better, fight stress and high blood pressure, improve your mood, plus strengthen bones and muscles.

How can we get more people to vaccinate against flu?

Flu (influenza) has traditionally been the underdog of vaccine-preventable diseases. People tend not to worry about the flu too much, and there are various myths about its prevention and the vaccine. It's true most people experience flu as a mild disease, but many don't recognise it can be more severe.

Can trying to meet specific exercise goals put us off being active altogether?

Encouraging people to meet specific fitness goals when they are new to exercising can be ineffective. In fact, it may even make it harder to become active, according to an editorial published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Fitbits could lead to negative impact on pupils' well-being, study finds

Pupils in secondary schools are reluctant to see fitness and health tracking devices such as Fitbits introduced into Physical Exercise lessons in schools and the device could potentially cause a negative impact on students' overall well-being, research led by the University of Birmingham has found.

Study finds GPs are unwilling to refer patients for bowel cancer checks

GPs can be reluctant to refer patients with symptoms of bowel cancer for further investigations, a study by the Universities of Birmingham and Exeter has found.


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