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100,000th Robotic-Arm Assisted Joint Replacement Procedure Performed in the U.S. with Stryker's Mako System

04:15 EDT 6 Jun 2017 | PR Newswire

MAHWAH, N.J., June 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Stryker Orthopaedics celebrated a landmark moment this month as the 100,000th cumulative robotic-arm assisted procedure in the U.S. was performed using the Mako System.1  This advanced robotic technology transforms the way joint replacement surgery is performed, enabling surgeons to have a more predictable surgical experience with increased accuracy.2,3,4,5

"This milestone demonstrates strong continuing acceptance of this technology and highlights how together with our customers we are creating the future by growing the robotics market," said Bill Huffnagle, President of Stryker's Joint Replacement Division. "We look forward to continuing to offer this advanced procedure to more surgeons nationwide."

Through CT-based 3D modeling of bone anatomy, surgeons can use the Mako System to create a personalized surgical plan and identify the implant size, orientation and alignment based on each patient's unique anatomy. The Mako System also enables surgeons to virtually modify the surgical plan intra-operatively and assists the surgeon in executing bone resections.

Earlier this year, Stryker announced the commercial launch of its highly anticipated robotic-arm assisted application, Mako Total Knee, for use with the market leading Triathlon Total Knee System. This latest advancement distinguishes the Mako System as the first and only robotic technology that can be used across the joint replacement service line to perform total knee, partial knee and total hip replacements. These treatment options are designed to relieve the pain caused by joint degeneration due to osteoarthritis.

About StrykerStryker is one of the world's leading medical technology companies and, together with our customers, we are driven to make healthcare better. The Company offers a diverse array of innovative products and services in Orthopaedics, Medical and Surgical, and Neurotechnology and Spine that help improve patient and hospital outcomes. Stryker is active in over 100 countries around the world.

  1. Stryker Sales Data, June 1, 2017
  2. Nawabi DH, Conditt MA, Ranawat AS, Dunbar NJ et al. Haptically guided robotic technology in total hip arthroplasty: a cadaveric investigation. J Engineering in Medicine. 2012;227(3):302-309.
  3. Illgen R. Robotic assisted total hip arthroplasty improves accuracy and clinical outcome compared with manual technique. 44th Annual Advances in Arthroplasty Course. October 7-10, 2014, Cambridge, MA.
  4. Anthony I, Bell SW, Blyth M, Jones B et al. Improved accuracy of component positioning with robotic-assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2016;98-A(8):627-35.
  5. Hampp EL, Scholl LY, Prieto M, Chang T, Abbasi AZ, Bhowmik-Stoker M, Otto JK, Jacofsky DJ, Mont MA. "Accuracy Assessment of Robotic and Manual TKA in a Cadaveric Model." Robotic-arm assisted total knee arthroplasty demonstrated greater accuracy to plan compared to manual technique. ORS 2017 Annual Meeting. San Diego. Poster No.2412.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Hip & Knee Replacements
Hip joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative and rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, fracture of the neck of the femur or functional deformity of the hip. Knee joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative, rheumatoid and post-traumatic arthritis, and for moderate deformity of the knee.

Joint replacement surgery is not appropriate for patients with certain types of infections, any mental or neuromuscular disorder which would create an unacceptable risk of prosthesis instability, prosthesis fixation failure or complications in postoperative care, compromised bone stock, skeletal immaturity, severe instability of the joint, or excessive body weight.

Like any surgery, joint replacement surgery has serious risks which include, but are not limited to, pain, bone fracture, change in the treated leg length (hip), joint stiffness, hip joint fusion, amputation, peripheral neuropathies (nerve damage), circulatory compromise (including deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the legs)), genitourinary disorders (including kidney failure), gastrointestinal disorders (including paralytic ileus (loss of intestinal digestive movement)), vascular disorders (including thrombus (blood clots), blood loss, or changes in blood pressure or heart rhythm), bronchopulmonary disorders (including emboli, stroke or pneumonia), heart attack, and death.

Implant related risks which may lead to a revision of the implant include dislocation, loosening, fracture, nerve damage, heterotopic bone formation (abnormal bone growth in tissue), wear of the implant, metal sensitivity, soft tissue imbalance, osteolysis (localized progressive bone loss), audible sounds during motion, and reaction to particle debris.

The information presented is for educational purposes only. Speak to your doctor to decide if joint replacement surgery is appropriate for you. Individual results vary and not all patients will return to the same activity level. The lifetime of any joint replacement is limited and depends on several factors like patient weight and activity level. Your doctor will counsel you about strategies to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device, including avoiding high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. It is important to closely follow your physician's instructions regarding post-surgery activity, treatment and follow-up care. Ask your doctor if a joint replacement is right for you.

Contact:

Jeanine Guilfoyle

Stephanie Bostaph

Stryker Orthopaedics

Ketchum

201-831-6277

703-229-2849

jeanine.guilfoyle@stryker.com

stephanie.bostaph@ketchum.com

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/100000th-robotic-arm-assisted-joint-replacement-procedure-performed-in-the-us-with-strykers-mako-system-300469080.html

SOURCE Stryker Orthopaedics

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