Advertisement

Topics

For the First Time, Researchers Have Mapped the Complete Genome of Two Closely Related Megapests

08:35 EDT 3 Aug 2017 | Meridian Institute

Researchers from Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have, for the first time, mapped the complete genome of the Cotton Bollworm and the Corn Earworm, both of which are megapests that cause in excess of US$5 billion in control costs and damage to agricultural yields in Asia, Europe, Africa, America and Australia. "It [the bollworm] is the single most important pest of agriculture in the world, making it humanity's greatest competitor for food and fibre," CSIRO Scientist John Oakeshott said. "Its genomic arsenal has allowed it to outgun all our known insecticides through the development of resistance, reflecting its name - armigera which means armed and warlike." In mapping the genome of these two closely related species, the researchers identified more than 17,000 protein coding genes. This level of detail enables scientists to identify weak spots in the caterpillars, as well as predict how they will mutate and even breed plants they will not want to eat. CSIRO Health and Biosecurity Honorary Fellow Karl Gordon said the genome mapping allows scientists to use the “full range of agricultural science” to combat the pests. "Our recent analyses of the complete genome, its adaptations and spread over the years are a huge step forward in combating these megapests,” he added.

Original Article: For the First Time, Researchers Have Mapped the Complete Genome of Two Closely Related Megapests

NEXT ARTICLE

More From BioPortfolio on "For the First Time, Researchers Have Mapped the Complete Genome of Two Closely Related Megapests"

Quick Search
Advertisement