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Epidemiology of valvular heart disease in the adult.

Summary of "Epidemiology of valvular heart disease in the adult."

Valvular heart disease remains common in industrialized countries, because the decrease in prevalence of rheumatic heart diseases has been accompanied by an increase in that of degenerative valve diseases. Aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation are the two most common types of valvular disease in Europe. The prevalence of valvular disease increases sharply with age, owing to the predominance of degenerative etiologies. The burden of heart valve disease in the elderly has an important impact on patient management, given the high frequency of comorbidity and the increased risk associated with intervention in this age group. Endocarditis is an important etiology of valvular disease and is most commonly caused by Staphylococci. Rheumatic heart disease remains prevalent in developing countries.

Affiliation

Cardiology Department, Bichat Hospital, AP-HP, 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75018 Paris, France.

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Nature reviews. Cardiology
ISSN: 1759-5010
Pages:

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)

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