Surveillance bias in outcomes reporting.

06:00 EDT 16th June 2011 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Surveillance bias in outcomes reporting."

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Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association
ISSN: 1538-3598
Pages: 2462-3


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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A cancer registry mandated under the National Cancer Act of 1971 to operate and maintain a population-based cancer reporting system, reporting periodically estimates of cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program is a continuing project of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Among its goals, in addition to assembling and reporting cancer statistics, are the monitoring of annual cancer incident trends and the promoting of studies designed to identify factors amenable to cancer control interventions. (From National Cancer Institute, NIH Publication No. 91-3074, October 1990)

Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.

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