Lateral Incision Surgery for Pilonidal Sinus: Death of a Dogma.

06:00 EST 17th December 2011 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Lateral Incision Surgery for Pilonidal Sinus: Death of a Dogma."

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Department of Colorectal Surgery, Royal Shrewsbury Hospital, Mytton Oak Road, Shrewsbury, SY3 8XQ, UK,

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: World journal of surgery
ISSN: 1432-2323


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Effectiveness of Limberg and Karydakis flap in recurrent pilonidal sinus disease.

Sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus is common in young men and may recur over time after surgery. We investigated whether a factor exists that can aid in the determination of the preferred technique betwee...

Minimally Invasive Surgical Approach to Complicated Recurrent Pilonidal Sinus.

Pilonidal sinus is considered as a simple and frequently occurring disease localized at the sacrococcygeal area. However, at the intergluteal region, it can often turn into a chronic and complicated d...

Epidural anesthesia for pilonidal sinus surgery: ropivacaine versus levobupivacaine.

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The use of topical 10 % metronidazole in the treatment of non-healing pilonidal sinus wounds after surgery.

Posttreatment Imaging of the Paranasal Sinuses Following Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

Endoscopic sinus surgery is a minimally invasive option for the treatment of several nonneoplastic indications, particularly for medically refractory sinusitis and polyposis. Numerous interventions ca...

Clinical Trials [4267 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Mid-line Excision Versus Karydakis Operation for Pilonidal Sinus

The trial compares excision in the midline at surgery for pilonidal disease versus excision lateral of the midline (Karydakis operation) at surgery for pilonidal disease by randomly alloca...

Sacrococcygeal Local Anesthesia With Different Doses of Clonidine for Pilonidal Sinus Surgery

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Comparison Between Laying Open and Sinus Excision of Pilonidal Sinus - a Randomized Study

A pilonidal sinus is a cyst or abscess near or on the natal cleft of the buttocks that often contains hair and skin debris. The condition is common and requires surgery to be cured. Severa...

Use of Plasma Rich in Growth Factors (PRGF) in Pilonidal Sinus Excision

The use of plasma rich in growth factors in wound excision pilonidal sinus could improve the healing process of the wound, when compared with the usual technique of daily local healing. Th...

Karydakis Procedure Versus Laying-Open in Sacrococcygeal Pilonidal Sinus

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A hair-containing cyst or sinus, occurring chiefly in the coccygeal region.

Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the LATERAL SINUSES. This condition is often associated with ear infections (OTITIS MEDIA or MASTOIDITIS) without antibiotic treatment. In developed nations, lateral sinus thrombosis can result from CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; THROMBOPHILIA; and other conditions. Clinical features include HEADACHE; VERTIGO; and increased intracranial pressure.

Air-filled spaces located within the bones around the NASAL CAVITY. They are extensions of the nasal cavity and lined by the ciliated NASAL MUCOSA. Each sinus is named for the cranial bone in which it is located, such as the ETHMOID SINUS; the FRONTAL SINUS; the MAXILLARY SINUS; and the SPHENOID SINUS.

Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.

Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS or the inferior sagittal sinus. Sagittal sinus thrombosis can result from infections, hematological disorders, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES. Clinical features are primarily related to the increased intracranial pressure causing HEADACHE; NAUSEA; and VOMITING. Severe cases can evolve to SEIZURES or COMA.