Advertisement
Advertise here Publish your press releases here Sponsor BioPortfolio
Follow us on Twitter Sign up for daily news and research emails Contributors wanted

Hemolysis and sublethal injury of RBCs after routine blood bank manipulations.

20:41 EDT 19th April 2014 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Hemolysis and sublethal injury of RBCs after routine blood bank manipulations."

Objectives: To determine the extent of RBC sublethal injury in male donor units as measured by both the mechanical fragility index (MFI) and percentage hemolysis after RBCs underwent leukoreduction (LR), irradiation (IRRAD), and washing. Background: RBCs frequently undergo post-collection processing to meet certain recipient's special needs. The extent of hemolysis and sublethal injury following these interventions has not been fully characterised. Methods: Eight to ten day old male, AS-5 RBCs underwent either LR, IRRAD or washing. A control group of male, AS-5 RBCs were unmanipulated. The MFI, percent hemolysis, and plasma free hemoglobin (PFHb) were measured immediately after manipulation and, for a series of irradiated RBCs, 28 days after irradiation (IRRAD28). Results: The MFI of the washed units was significantly higher than unmanipulated, LR, IRRAD, IRRAD28 units (P < 0·0001). The percent hemolysis was highest in the IRRAD28 units (1·4%) followed by the washed units (0·74%); the other three units demonstrated significantly less hemolysis (P < 0·0001). The largest mean total amount of PFHb per unit was found in the IRRAD28 units (500·5 mg/unit) followed by the washed units (149·8 mg/unit); the mean total amount of PFHb in the three other types of units was significantly less than that found in both the IRRAD28 and washed units (P at least < 0·001). Conclusion: There is a significant quantity of PFHb in IRRAD28 RBC units, and potentially in washed allogeneic RBC units. Clinical correlation is required to determine if this quantity of PFHb and the transfusion of potentially fragile RBCs causes adverse events.

Affiliation

Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center The Institute for Transfusion Medicine Department of Anesthesiology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Transfusion medicine (Oxford, England)
ISSN: 1365-3148
Pages:

Links

PubMed Articles [10010 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

A case of passenger lymphocyte syndrome following minor ABO incompatible renal transplantation.

Immune hemolysis is one of the adverse effects that can occur following solid organ transplantation. Understanding the clinical settings and the various causes is necessary for prompt diagnosis and ap...

In-vitro stem cell derived red blood cells for transfusion: are we there yet?

To date, the use of red blood cells (RBCs) produced from stem cells in vitro has not proved practical for routine transfusion. However, the perpetual and widespread shortage of blood products, problem...

The effect of turbulent viscous shear stress on red blood cell hemolysis.

Non-physiologic turbulent flow occurs in medical cardiovascular devices resulting in hemodynamic stresses that may damage red blood cells (RBC) and cause hemolysis. Hemolysis was previously thought to...

Retrospective and Prospective Investigations about "Quatrefoil" Erythrocytes in Canine Blood Smears.

The presence of unusual two RBCs patterns (so-called "quatrefoil RBCs," qRBCs) on canine blood smears at Optical Microscope (OM) was seen during routine evaluation of CBCs. Two consecutive retrospecti...

TNT003, an inhibitor of the serine protease C1s, prevents complement activation induced by cold agglutinin disease patient autoantibodies.

Activation of the classical pathway of complement (CP) is often associated with autoimmune disorders in which disease pathology is linked to the presence of an autoantibody. One such disorder is cold...

Clinical Trials [2939 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

The Link Between Anemia and Deficits in Memory and Attention in Individuals With Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder that affects red blood cells (RBCs). People with sickle cell disease frequently experience anemia, or a low number of RBCs. RBCs are resp...

Frozen Red Blood Cell Transfusions in Trauma Patients

The purpose of this study is to look at red blood cell(RBC)transfusions in trauma patients and evaluate for any differences between the age of the RBCs and how they were stored. The invest...

Advance Targeted Transfusion in Anemic Cardiac Surgical Patients for Kidney Protection: A Proof of Concept Pilot Study

One of the major complications of heart surgery is kidney injury, which occurs in up to 30% of patients and is associated with poor outcomes including death. We have found that patients w...

Measurement of Carboxyhemoglobin by Gas Chromatography as an Index of Hemolysis

The purpose of this research study is to more accurately measure the amount of true red blood cell breakdown (hemolysis) in newborn babies with potentially problematic blood type mismatch...

Alpha-1 Foundation DNA and Tissue Bank

This is a long-term follow-up banking protocol that collects medical information and tissue (blood, liver and lung) samples for future research; use of data and samples for research purpos...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

The semi-permeable outer structure of a red blood cell. It is known as a red cell 'ghost' after HEMOLYSIS.

A syndrome of HEMOLYSIS, elevated liver ENZYMES, and low blood platelets count (THROMBOCYTOPENIA). HELLP syndrome is observed in pregnant women with PRE-ECLAMPSIA or ECLAMPSIA who also exhibit LIVER damage and abnormalities in BLOOD COAGULATION.

Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.

Diagnostic procedures, such as laboratory tests and x-rays, routinely performed on all individuals or specified categories of individuals in a specified situation, e.g., patients being admitted to the hospital. These include routine tests administered to neonates.

An injury in which the damage is located on the opposite side of the primary impact site. A blow to the back of head which results in contrecoup injury to the frontal lobes of the brain is the most common type.

Search BioPortfolio: