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Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

04:05 EDT 23rd July 2014 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Progressive Supranuclear Palsy."

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is the second-most-common parkinsonian neurodegenerative disorder following Parkinson's disease. Although PSP was first identified clinically more than 40 years ago, it remains poorly recognized and underdiagnosed. Using an individual example, this article describes the epidemiology, neuropathology, clinical course, supportive management strategies, and resources for patients with PSP and their families.

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Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Journal of gerontological nursing
ISSN: 0098-9134
Pages: 1-4

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PubMed Articles [2135 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy.

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that PSP can present clinically as an atypical dementing syndrome dominated by a progress...

Changes in the Thalamus in Atypical Parkinsonism Detected Using Shape Analysis and Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:The thalamus is interconnected with the nigrostriatal system and cerebral cortex and has a major role in cognitive function and sensorimotor integration. The purpose of this stu...

Progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome after aortic aneurysm repair: a case series.

The syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome is a rare complication of ascending aortic aneurysm repair. We report two patients with videos and present a table of prior reported cases....

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A Heterogeneous Degeneration Involving the Brain Stem, Basal Ganglia and Cerebellum With Vertical Gaze and Pseudobulbar Palsy, Nuchal Dystonia and Dementia.

Clinical Trials: Past, Current, and Future for Atypical Parkinsonian Syndromes.

There are currently no effective Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for atypical parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, dementia with L...

Clinical Trials [663 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Risk Factors for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP)

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is the most common atypical parkinsonian movement disorder. This study will determine the role of specific genetic, occupational and environmental com...

Effects of Coenzyme Q10 in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP)

The clinical syndrome of PSP responds poorly to all available forms of therapy used in Parkinson's Disease (PD). Currently, no effective treatment exists. Coenzyme Q10 in high doses has b...

Trial of Valproic Acid in Patients With Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorder, clinically characterized by parkinsonism with prominent axial involvement and postural instab...

Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Davunetide for the Treatment of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

The purpose of the study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of davunetide for the treatment of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

Efficacy Study for Treatment of Dementia in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

to show that 1. patients improve and stabilize after 12 -24 week treatment with rivastigmine in memory function 2. use of rivastigmine has a positive effect on apathy in P...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Neurodegenerative disorders involving deposition of abnormal tau protein isoforms (TAU PROTEINS) in neurons and glial cells in the brain. Pathological aggregations of tau proteins are associated with mutation of the tau gene on chromosome 17 in patients with ALZHEIMER DISEASE; DEMENTIA; PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS; progressive supranuclear palsy (SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE); and corticobasal degeneration.

A degenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by balance difficulties; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS (supranuclear ophthalmoplegia); DYSARTHRIA; swallowing difficulties; and axial DYSTONIA. Onset is usually in the fifth decade and disease progression occurs over several years. Pathologic findings include neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in the dorsal MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS; RED NUCLEUS; pallidum; dentate nucleus; and vestibular nuclei. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1076-7)

Diseases characterized by a selective degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord, brainstem, or motor cortex. Clinical subtypes are distinguished by the major site of degeneration. In AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS there is involvement of upper, lower, and brainstem motor neurons. In progressive muscular atrophy and related syndromes (see MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL) the motor neurons in the spinal cord are primarily affected. With progressive bulbar palsy (BULBAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE), the initial degeneration occurs in the brainstem. In primary lateral sclerosis, the cortical neurons are affected in isolation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)

A motor neuron disease marked by progressive weakness of the muscles innervated by cranial nerves of the lower brain stem. Clinical manifestations include dysarthria, dysphagia, facial weakness, tongue weakness, and fasciculations of the tongue and facial muscles. The adult form of the disease is marked initially by bulbar weakness which progresses to involve motor neurons throughout the neuroaxis. Eventually this condition may become indistinguishable from AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS. Fazio-Londe syndrome is an inherited form of this illness which occurs in children and young adults. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1091; Brain 1992 Dec;115(Pt 6):1889-1900)

A form of multiple sclerosis characterized by a progressive deterioration in neurologic function which is in contrast to the more typical relapsing remitting form. If the clinical course is free of distinct remissions, it is referred to as primary progressive multiple sclerosis. When the progressive decline is punctuated by acute exacerbations, it is referred to as progressive relapsing multiple sclerosis. The term secondary progressive multiple sclerosis is used when relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis evolves into the chronic progressive form. (From Ann Neurol 1994;36 Suppl:S73-S79; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914)

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