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Oscillating central motor networks in pathological tremors and voluntary movements. What makes the difference?

Summary of "Oscillating central motor networks in pathological tremors and voluntary movements. What makes the difference?"

Parkinsonian tremor (PD), essential tremor (ET) and voluntarily mimicked tremor represent fundamentally different motor phenomena, yet, magnetoencephalographic and imaging data suggest their origin in the same motor centers of the brain. Using EEG-EMG coherence and coherent source analysis we found a different pattern of corticomuscular delays, time courses and central representations for the basic and double tremor frequencies typical for PD suggesting a wider range defective oscillatory activity. For the basic tremor frequency similar central representations in primary sensorimotor, prefrontal/premotor and diencephalic (e.g. thalamic) areas were reproduced for all three tremors. But renormalized partial directed coherence of the spatially filtered (source) signals revealed a mainly unidirectional flow of information from the diencephalon to cortex in voluntary tremor, e.g. a thalamocortical relay, as opposed to a bidirectional subcortico-cortical flow in PD and ET promoting uncontrollable, e.g. thalamocortical, loop oscillations. Our results help to understand why pathological tremors although originating from the physiological motor network are not under voluntary control and they may contribute to the solution of the puzzle why high frequency thalamic stimulation has a selective effect on pathological tremor leaving voluntary movement performance almost unaltered.

Affiliation

Department of Neurology, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany.

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: NeuroImage
ISSN: 1095-9572
Pages: 1331-9

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Networks of nerve cells that control the firing patterns of MOTOR NEURONS to produce rhythmic movements such as MASTICATION; WALKING; SWIMMING; RESPIRATION; and PERISTALSIS.

A syndrome characterized by DYSARTHRIA, dysphagia, dysphonia, impairment of voluntary movements of tongue and facial muscles, and emotional lability. This condition is caused by diseases that affect the motor fibers that travel from the cerebral cortex to the lower BRAIN STEM (i.e., corticobulbar tracts); including MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS; MOTOR NEURON DISEASE; and CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p489)

Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.

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Impairment of the ability to perform smoothly coordinated voluntary movements. This condition may affect the limbs, trunk, eyes, pharynx, larynx, and other structures. Ataxia may result from impaired sensory or motor function. Sensory ataxia may result from posterior column injury or PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES. Motor ataxia may be associated with CEREBELLAR DISEASES; CEREBRAL CORTEX diseases; THALAMIC DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; injury to the RED NUCLEUS; and other conditions.

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