Minor physical abnormalities and clinical features in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

18:27 EDT 1st August 2014 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Minor physical abnormalities and clinical features in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders."

INTRODUCTION. Minor physical anomalies are nonspecific morphologic variants generated during gestation. They are markers of events (inherited and/or acquired) related with the 'neuroprogression' of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders and may be differentially involved with their symptom profiles. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship of minor physical anomalies with positive syndrome, negative syndrome and general psychopathology in patients with schizophrenia or other functional psychoses. PATIENTS AND METHODS. Cross-sectional study of patients with schizophrenia or other functional psychoses consecutively hospitalized with an acute psychotic episode. Minor physical anomalies were evaluated with the Waldrop scale and clinical characteristics of psychosis were measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). RESULTS. 41 patients with functional psychoses were evaluated: 32 (78%) with schizophrenia, 9 (21.9%) with psychotic disorder not otherwise specified. There was no relationship between the Waldrop scale score and score on the PANSS, its negative scale and its general psychopathology scale. The positive scale of the PANSS and the Waldrop scale were correlated in the whole sample (Spearman rho = 0.356; p = 0.022). In the group of patients with schizophrenia, the correlation was even greater (Spearman rho = 0.420; p = 0.017). CONCLUSIONS. The path from apparently premorbid stages to specific clinical pictures in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders is determined by the neurodevelopment, a dynamic process influenced by genetic inheritance and environmental injuries.

Affiliation

Hospital Psiquiatric Universitari Institut Pere Mata, 43206 Reus, Espana.

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Revista de neurologia
ISSN: 1576-6578
Pages: 468-74

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