Advertisement

Topics

Impairment of sensory-motor integration in patients affected by RLS.

Summary of "Impairment of sensory-motor integration in patients affected by RLS."

Much evidence suggests that restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disorder characterized by an unsuppressed response to sensory urges due to abnormalities in inhibitory pathways that specifically link sensory input and motor output. Therefore, in the present study, we tested sensory-motor integration in patients with RLS, measured by short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) and long latency afferent inhibition (LAI). SAI and LAI were determined using transcranial magnetic stimulation before and after 1month of dopaminergic treatment in RLS patients. Ten naïve patients with idiopathic RLS and ten healthy age-matched controls were recruited. Patients with secondary causes for RLS (e.g. renal failure, anaemia, low iron and ferritin) were excluded, as well as those with other sleep disorders. Untreated RLS patients demonstrated deficient SAI in the human motor cortex, which proved revertible toward normal values after dopaminergic treatment. We demonstrated an alteration of sensory-motor integration, which is normalized by dopaminergic treatment, in patients affected by RLS. It is likely that the reduction of SAI might contribute significantly to the release of the involuntary movements and might account for the sensory urge typical of this condition.

Affiliation

Department of Neurosciences, Psychiatry and Anaesthesiological Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy, enzo.rizzo@gmail.com.

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Journal of neurology
ISSN: 1432-1459
Pages:

Links

DeepDyve research library

PubMed Articles [37054 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Uncovering sensory axonal dysfunction in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic neuropathy.

This study investigated sensory and motor nerve excitability properties to elucidate the development of diabetic neuropathy. A total of 109 type 2 diabetes patients were recruited, and 106 were analyz...

Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of hereditary motor-sensory neuropathy 1X caused by the mutation c. 259C> G (p. P87A) in the GJB1 gene of patients from the Republic of Bashkortostan.

Hereditary motor-sensory neuropathy 1X (НМСН 1X) is the second frequent form of hereditary motor-sensory neuropathies caused by mutations in the GJB1 gene (gap junction B1 type). The authors have ...

Fine Motor Function Skills in Patients with Parkinson Disease with and without Mild Cognitive Impairment.

The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between impaired fine motor skills in Parkinson disease (PD) patients and their cognitive status, and to determine whether fine motor skills...

Subthalamic deep brain stimulation modulates conscious perception of sensory function in Parkinson's disease.

Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is used to treat refractory motor complications in Parkinson disease (PD), but its effects on non-motor symptoms remain uncertain. Up to 80% of PD patients...

Impaired Communication Between the Motor and Somatosensory Homunculus Is Associated With Poor Manual Dexterity in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Fine motor skill impairments are common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), significantly affecting quality of life. Sensory inputs reaching the primary motor cortex (M1) from the somatosensory cortex ...

Clinical Trials [3514 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Sensori-motor Integration Training in Multiple Sclerosis

Balance impairment is a common and very disabling disturbance in people with Multiple Sclerosis. The efficacy of pharmacotherapy in treating balance impairment in MS is poorly documented i...

Sensory Integration Therapy in Autism: Mechanisms and Effectiveness

A common feature of ASD is over or under sensitivity to the environment and difficulty putting sensory information together in an orderly way, referred to here as sensory issues. Buildin...

Self-motion Perception in Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's Disease as well as being a disorder of motor function also causes a wide range of non-motor disturbances many of which are involved in the prodromal stage prior to the onset of...

Metacognitive Self-regulated Learning and Sensory Integrative Approaches for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are increasing each year. There are about 1 in 160 children for the age group of 6-12 years old in Australia are diagnosed with ASD. Children w...

Upside Down, Give me the Handle

In schizophrenia, dislocation of psychic functions involving a loss of contact with reality is frequently found. A fragmentation of motor and sensory perceptions could be held responsible ...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Diseases of multiple peripheral nerves simultaneously. Polyneuropathies usually are characterized by symmetrical, bilateral distal motor and sensory impairment with a graded increase in severity distally. The pathological processes affecting peripheral nerves include degeneration of the axon, myelin or both. The various forms of polyneuropathy are categorized by the type of nerve affected (e.g., sensory, motor, or autonomic), by the distribution of nerve injury (e.g., distal vs. proximal), by nerve component primarily affected (e.g., demyelinating vs. axonal), by etiology, or by pattern of inheritance.

Impairment of the ability to perform smoothly coordinated voluntary movements. This condition may affect the limbs, trunk, eyes, pharynx, larynx, and other structures. Ataxia may result from impaired sensory or motor function. Sensory ataxia may result from posterior column injury or PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES. Motor ataxia may be associated with CEREBELLAR DISEASES; CEREBRAL CORTEX diseases; THALAMIC DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; injury to the RED NUCLEUS; and other conditions.

Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.

Marked impairments in the development of motor coordination such that the impairment interferes with activities of daily living. (From DSM-IV, 1994)

Diseases characterized by a selective degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord, brainstem, or motor cortex. Clinical subtypes are distinguished by the major site of degeneration. In AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS there is involvement of upper, lower, and brainstem motor neurons. In progressive muscular atrophy and related syndromes (see MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL) the motor neurons in the spinal cord are primarily affected. With progressive bulbar palsy (BULBAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE), the initial degeneration occurs in the brainstem. In primary lateral sclerosis, the cortical neurons are affected in isolation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)

Quick Search
Advertisement
 


DeepDyve research library

Relevant Topics

Sleep Disorders
Sleep disorders disrupt sleep during the night, or cause sleepiness during the day, caused by physiological or psychological factors. The common ones include snoring and sleep apnea, insomnia, parasomnias, sleep paralysis, restless legs syndrome, circa...

Nutrition
Within medicine, nutrition (the study of food and the effect of its components on the body) has many different roles. Appropriate nutrition can help prevent certain diseases, or treat others. In critically ill patients, artificial feeding by tubes need t...


Searches Linking to this Article