Brief Report: Further Evidence of Sensory Subtypes in Autism.

06:00 EDT 15th September 2010 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Brief Report: Further Evidence of Sensory Subtypes in Autism."

Distinct sensory processing (SP) subtypes in autism have been reported previously. This study sought to replicate the previous findings in an independent sample of thirty children diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Model-based cluster analysis of parent-reported sensory functioning (measured using the Short Sensory Profile) confirmed the triad of sensory subtypes reported earlier. Subtypes were differentiated from each other based on degree of SP dysfunction, taste/smell sensitivity and vestibular/proprioceptive processing. Further elucidation of two of the subtypes was also achieved in this study. Children with a primary pattern of sensory-based inattention could be further described as sensory seekers or non-seekers. Children with a primary pattern of vestibular/proprioceptive dysfunction were also differentiated on movement and tactile sensitivity.


Division of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Medical Professions, The Ohio State University, 406C Atwell Hall, 453 West 10th Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA,

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Journal of autism and developmental disorders
ISSN: 1573-3432


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