Surgical management of osteomas of the frontal recess and sinus: extending the limits of the endoscopic approach.

17:59 EST 26th November 2014 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Surgical management of osteomas of the frontal recess and sinus: extending the limits of the endoscopic approach."

Osteomas are among the most common benign tumors of the paranasal sinuses. Symptomatic osteomas are most often found in the frontal recess and the frontal sinus. While the extranasal approach is still a part of the treatment concept for removing osteomas at this localization, over the last years the endoscopically controlled endonasal approach has greatly gained in importance due to the improved surgical equipment. We retrospectively analyzed the surgical indication, surgical approach and outcome of the removal of osteomas of the frontal recess and the frontal sinus performed at our hospital between 1996 and 2010. The exact surgical technique, intra- and postoperative complications, the duration of the hospital stay and the follow-up and subjective contentment of the patients were evaluated. With a total of 24 patients being included, the study comprises one of the largest groups of patients with osteomas of the frontal recess and sinus. Over the study period, the frequency of the endoscopic approach clearly increased. Previously suggested guidelines for the endoscopic resection of a frontal sinus osteoma turned out to be superseded. Endoscopically controlled resection even of large, adversely located osteomas of the frontal recess and the frontal sinus is becoming increasingly possible, but is still naturally limited by the individual anatomic conditions and the need for experienced surgeons.

Affiliation

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich, Germany, johannes_georg.ledderose@med.uni-muenchen.de.

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (
ISSN: 1434-4726
Pages:

Links

PubMed Articles [15308 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Open surgical management of an asymptomatic giant frontal sinus osteoma.

Osteomas are benign, slow-growing tumors that arise most frequently in the craniomaxillofacial region, and in particular in correspondence of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Osteomas may be asymptomat...

Frontal Sinus Fractures: A Conservative Shift.

This article reflects on the changing management of frontal sinus fractures. Severity of these injuries has decreased tremendously since the universal adoption of seat belts and air bags. Recently, th...

Giant Paranasal Sinus Osteomas: Surgical Treatment Options.

Giant paranasal sinus osteomas are rare tumors that may be very closely adherent to surrounding anatomical structures, and complete removal of these tumors may be very challenging. We report 6 cases o...

The association of frontal recess anatomy and mucosal disease on the presence of chronic frontal sinusitis: a computed tomographic analysis.

The frontal sinus has the most complex and variable drainage routes of all paranasal sinus regions. The goal of this study was to identify these anatomical factors and inflammation areas relating to c...

Frontal sinus mucocoeles: new algorithm for surgical management.

Abstract Background: Frontal sinus mucocoeles require a structured approach to their surgical management. We share our experience of a novel method of positional classification for frontal mucocoele a...

Clinical Trials [2771 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Comparison Between Laying Open and Sinus Excision of Pilonidal Sinus - a Randomized Study

A pilonidal sinus is a cyst or abscess near or on the natal cleft of the buttocks that often contains hair and skin debris. The condition is common and requires surgery to be cured. Severa...

Maxillary Sinus Floor Elevation Following Simultaneous Implant Installation Without Graft Material

The present study describes and evaluates the surgical protocol for sinus mucosal lining elevation of the maxillary sinus for Dental Implant Insertion without Bone grafting Underneath the ...

Maxillary Sinus Irrigation in the Management of Chronic Rhinosinusitis

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of maxillary sinus saline irrigation in conjunction with systemic antibiotic therapy versus systemic antibiotic therapy alone in ...

Studies of Frontal Lobe Brain Functioning in Schizophrenia

The purpose of this study is to use brain imaging technology to investigate the role of the frontal lobe of the brain in the thinking of individuals with schizophrenia and other neuropsych...

Intravenous Tranexamic Acid and Intraoperative Visualization During Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is an effective treatment of sinus disease. FESS is carried out using cameras to view the surgical field. Bleeding during the surgery can lead to...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Air-filled spaces located within the bones around the NASAL CAVITY. They are extensions of the nasal cavity and lined by the ciliated NASAL MUCOSA. Each sinus is named for the cranial bone in which it is located, such as the ETHMOID SINUS; the FRONTAL SINUS; the MAXILLARY SINUS; and the SPHENOID SINUS.

One of the paired, but seldom symmetrical, air spaces located between the inner and outer compact layers of the FRONTAL BONE in the forehead.

A recess on each side in the wall of the HYPOPHARYNX.

Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the FRONTAL SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE or HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE.

An intracranial or rarely intraspinal suppurative process invading the space between the inner surface of the DURA MATER and the outer surface of the ARACHNOID. Bacteria and other pathogenic organisms may gain entrance to the subdural space from the FRONTAL SINUS; ETHMOID SINUS; middle ear (EAR, MIDDLE); MASTOID; or as the result of CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA or NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES. This condition may be associated with intracranial sinus thrombosis (SINUS THROMBOSIS, INTRACRANIAL). Circumscribed collections of purulent material in the subdural space are referred to as subdural abscesses. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p709)

Search BioPortfolio:
Loading