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PubMed Journal Database | MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report - Page: 3 RSS

16:32 EST 19th January 2017 | BioPortfolio

The US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health manage PubMed.gov which comprises of more than 21 million records, papers, reports for biomedical literature, including MEDLINE, life science and medical journals, articles, reviews, reports and  books.  BioPortfolio aims to publish relevant information on published papers, clinical trials and news associated with users selected topics.

For example view all recent relevant publications on Epigenetics and associated publications and clincial trials.

Showing PubMed Articles 51–75 of 1,100+ from MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Notes from the Field: Chlorination Strategies for Drinking Water During a Cholera Epidemic - Tanzania, 2016.

Since August 2015, the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children (MoHCDGEC) of Tanzania has been leading the response to a widespread cholera outbreak. As of June 9, 2016, cholera had affected 23 of 25 regions in Tanzania, with 21,750 cumulative cases and 341 deaths reported (Ally Nyanga, MoHCDGEC Emergency Operations Center, personal communication, June 2016). Approximately one fourth of all cases occurred in the Dar es Salaam region on the east coast. Regions surrounding Lake...

QuickStats: Cancer Death Rates* for Children and Teens Aged 1-19 Years - United States, 1999, 2006, and 2014(†).

National Progress Toward Hepatitis C Elimination - Georgia, 2015-2016.

The country of Georgia has a high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, associated with exposures to HCV in health care settings with inadequate infection control and unsafe injections among persons who inject drugs (1). In April 2015, in collaboration with CDC and other partners, Georgia embarked on a program to eliminate HCV infection, subsequently defined as achieving a 90% reduction in prevalence by 2020. The initial phase of the program focused on providing HCV treatment to infected persons ...

Declines in Opioid Prescribing After a Private Insurer Policy Change - Massachusetts, 2011-2015.

Overdose deaths involving opioid pain medications are epidemic in the United States, in part because of high opioid prescribing rates and associated abuse of these drugs (1). In 2014, nearly 2 million U.S. residents either abused or were dependent on prescription opioids (2). In Massachusetts, unintentional opioid-related overdose deaths, including deaths involving heroin, increased 45% from 2012 to 2013.* In 2014, the rate of these deaths reached 20.0 per 100,000, nearly 2.5 times higher than the U.S. rate...

Status of New Vaccine Introduction - Worldwide, September 2016.

Since the global Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) was launched in 1974, vaccination against six diseases (tuberculosis, polio, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, and measles) has prevented millions of deaths and disabilities (1). Significant advances have been made in the development and introduction of vaccines, and licensed vaccines are now available to prevent 25 diseases (2,3). Historically, new vaccines only became available in low-income and middle-income countries decades after being introduced in...

Acute Occupational Pesticide-Related Illness and Injury -United States, 2007-2011.

CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) collects data on acute pesticide-related illness and injury reported by 12 states (California, Florida, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Nebraska, North Carolina, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Washington). This report summarizes the data on illnesses and injuries arising from occupational exposure to conventional pesticides from 2007 through 2011. This report is a part of the Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease O...

Acute Nonoccupational Pesticide-Related Illness and Injury - United States, 2007-2011.

CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) collects data on acute pesticide-related illness and injury reported by 12 states (California, Florida, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Washington). This report summarizes the data on illnesses and injuries arising from nonoccupational exposure to conventional pesticides that were reported during 2007-2011. Conventional pesticides include insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and...

Surveillance for Cancer Incidence and Mortality - United States, 2012.

This report provides, in tabular and graphic form, official federal statistics on the occurrence of cancer for 2012 and trends for 1999-2012 as reported by CDC and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) (1). Cancer incidence data are from population-based cancer registries that participate in CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and NCI's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program reported as of November 2014. Cancer mortality data are from death certificate information reported t...

Patterns and Trends in Age-Specific Black-White Differences in Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality - United States, 1999-2014.

Breast cancer continues to be the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among U.S. women (1). Compared with white women, black women historically have had lower rates of breast cancer incidence and, beginning in the 1980s, higher death rates (1). This report examines age-specific black-white disparities in breast cancer incidence during 1999-2013 and mortality during 2000-2014 in the United States using data from United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) (2). Overall rate...

Introduction to the Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks - United States.

With this 2016 Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks - United States, CDC is publishing official statistics for the occurrence of nationally notifiable noninfectious conditions and disease outbreaks for the second time in the same volume of MMWR as the annual Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases and Conditions (1). As was the case for the 2015 Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks (2), this joint publication is the result of a request by the...

Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases and Conditions - United States, 2014.

The Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases and Conditions-United States, 2014 (hereafter referred to as the summary) contains the official statistics, in tabular and graphic form, for the reported occurrence of nationally notifiable infectious diseases and conditions in the United States for 2014. Unless otherwise noted, data are final totals for 2014 reported as of June 30, 2015. These statistics are collected and compiled from reports sent by U.S. state and territory, New York City, and District of Col...

Elevated Blood Lead Levels Among Employed Adults - United States, 1994-2013.

CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and state health departments collect data on laboratory-reported adult blood lead levels (BLLs). This report presents data on elevated BLLs among employed adults (defined as persons aged ≥16 years) in the United States for 1994-2013. This report is a part of the Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks - United States, which encompasses various surveillance years but is being published in 2016 (1). The Summary ...

Announcement: Global Handwashing Day - October 15, 2016.

October 15, 2016, marks Global Handwashing Day. This observance increases awareness and understanding of the importance of handwashing with soap as an effective and affordable means of preventing disease around the world.

Foodborne (1973-2013) and Waterborne (1971-2013) Disease Outbreaks - United States.

CDC collects data on foodborne and waterborne disease outbreaks reported by all U.S. states and territories through the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (FDOSS) (http://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/fdoss/surveillance/index.html) and the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/surveillance), respectively. These two systems are the primary source of national data describing the number of reported outbreaks; outbreak-associated illnesses, hospitaliza...

HIV Testing and Outcomes Among Hispanics/Latinos - United States, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands, 2014.

The 2015 National HIV/AIDS Strategy provides an updated plan to address health disparities in communities at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1,2). Hispanics/Latinos* are disproportionately affected by HIV in the United States. In 2014, 23% of HIV diagnoses were among Hispanics/Latinos, who represented 16% of the U.S. population (3). To examine HIV testing services, CDC analyzed 2014 data from the National HIV Prevention Program Monitoring and Evaluation (NHM&E) system submitted b...

Announcement: World Thrombosis Day - October 13, 2016.

October 13, 2016, is World Thrombosis Day. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are together referred to as venous thromboembolism (VTE). A DVT is a blood clot that develops in the veins of the lower leg, thigh, pelvis, or arm; PE occurs when a portion of a DVT breaks off and travels through the bloodstream to the lungs.

Blood Lead Levels in Children Aged <5 Years - United States, 2007-2013.

This report provides data concerning childhood blood lead levels (BLLs) in the United States during 2007-2013. These data were collected and compiled from raw data extracts sent by state and local health departments to CDC's Childhood Blood Lead Surveillance (CBLS) system. These raw data extracts have been de-identified and coded into a format specifically for childhood lead reporting. The numbers of children aged

Surveillance for Silicosis - Michigan and New Jersey, 2003-2011.

CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), state health departments, and other state entities maintain a state-based surveillance program of confirmed silicosis cases. Data on confirmed cases are collected and compiled by state entities and submitted to CDC. This report summarizes information for cases of silicosis that were reported to CDC for 2003-2011 by Michigan and New Jersey, the only states that continue to provide data voluntarily to NIOSH. The data for this report were fin...

Unmet Needs for Ancillary Services Among Hispanics/Latinos Receiving HIV Medical Care - United States, 2013-2014.

The prevalence of diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States is more than twice as high as the prevalence among non-Hispanic whites (1). Services that support retention in HIV medical care and assist with day-to-day living, referred to here as ancillary services, help persons living with HIV access HIV medical care, adhere to HIV treatment, and attain HIV viral suppression. The needs for these ancillary services among Hispanics/Latinos are not well descr...

QuickStats: Gestational Weight Gain* Among Women with Full-Term, Singleton Births, Compared with Recommendations - 48 States and the District of Columbia, 2015.

Gestational weight gain was within the recommended range for 32% of women giving birth to full-term, singleton infants in 2015, with 48% gaining more weight and 21% less weight than recommended. Approximately 44% of women who were underweight before pregnancy gained within the recommendations, compared with 39% of women who were normal weight, 26% of women who were overweight, and 24% of women with obesity before pregnancy. Weight gain above the recommendations was highest among women who were overweight (6...

Increase in Adverse Reactions Associated with Use of Synthetic Cannabinoids - Anchorage, Alaska, 2015-2016.

In July 2015, personnel in the Alaska Division of Public Health's Section of Epidemiology became aware of an increase in the number of patients being treated in Anchorage hospital emergency departments for adverse reactions associated with use of synthetic cannabinoids (SCs). SCs are a chemically diverse class of designer drugs that bind to the same cannabinoid receptors as tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive component of cannabis. A public health investigation was initiated to describe clinical out...

Progress Toward Global Eradication of Dracunculiasis -January 2015-June 2016.

Dracunculiasis (Guinea worm disease) is caused by Dracunculus medinensis, a parasitic worm. Approximately 1 year after a person acquires infection from drinking contaminated water, the worm emerges through the skin, usually on the leg. Pain and secondary bacterial infection can cause temporary or permanent disability that disrupts work and schooling. The campaign to eradicate dracunculiasis worldwide began in 1980 at CDC. In 1986, the World Health Assembly called for dracunculiasis elimination (1), and the ...

Falls and Fall Injuries Among Adults Aged ≥65 Years - United States, 2014.

Falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries among adults aged ≥65 years (older adults). During 2014, approximately 27,000 older adults died because of falls; 2.8 million were treated in emergency departments for fall-related injuries, and approximately 800,000 of these patients were subsequently hospitalized.* To estimate the numbers, percentages, and rates of falls and fall injuries among older adults by selected characteristics and state, CDC analyzed data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Fa...

HIV Testing Experience Before HIV Diagnosis Among Men Who Have Sex with Men - 21 Jurisdictions, United States, 2007-2013.

Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be the population most affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the United States. In 2014, 81% of diagnoses of HIV infection were among adult and adolescent males, and among these, 83% of infections were attributable to male-to-male sexual contact (1). Since 2006, CDC has recommended HIV testing at least annually for sexually active MSM to foster early detection of HIV infection and prevent HIV transmission (2,3). Several initiat...

Unmet Needs for Ancillary Services Among Men Who Have Sex with Men and Who Are Receiving HIV Medical Care - United States, 2013-2014.

Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the United States (1). Ancillary services, defined as services that support retention in HIV medical care and assist with day-to-day living, can improve the health of HIV-infected MSM and help them achieve viral suppression (2). To assess the unmet needs for ancillary services among MSM receiving outpatient HIV medical care during 2013-2014, CDC used data from the Medical Monitor...


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