Advertisement

Topics

PubMed Journal Database | Emergency medicine journal : EMJ RSS

20:41 EDT 26th March 2017 | BioPortfolio

The US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health manage PubMed.gov which comprises of more than 21 million records, papers, reports for biomedical literature, including MEDLINE, life science and medical journals, articles, reviews, reports and  books.  BioPortfolio aims to publish relevant information on published papers, clinical trials and news associated with users selected topics.

For example view all recent relevant publications on Epigenetics and associated publications and clincial trials.

Showing PubMed Articles 1–25 of 427 from Emergency medicine journal : EMJ

An elderly woman with bilateral raccoon eyes.

BET 1: Tranexamic acid in epistaxis: who bloody nose?

A shortcut review was carried out to establish whether tranexamic acid is effective in controlling epistaxis. Three studies were directly relevant to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these studies are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that there is not enough evidence to recommend tranexamic acid in the standard management of epistaxis.

Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary.

BET 2: Usefulness of IV lidocaine in the treatment of renal colic.

A shortcut review was carried out to establish whether intravenous lidocaine is effective in the management of renal colic. Two studies were directly relevant to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these studies are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that intravenous lidocaine may be of some benefit in renal colic. However, there are other maybe more effective drugs available.

Epigastric pain: a life-threatening condition.

What do emergency physicians in charge do? A qualitative observational study.

The emergency physician in charge role has developed in many large EDs to assist with patient flow. We aimed to describe and classify the problem-solving actions that this role requires.

Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation probably good, but adoption should not be too fast and furious!

Emergency extracorporeal life support and ongoing resuscitation: a retrospective comparison for refractory out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

In refractory cardiac arrest, with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for more than 30 min, chances of survival are small. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) is an option for certain patients with cardiac arrest. The aim of this study was to evaluate characteristics of patients selected for ECPR.

Progressive prediction of hospitalisation in the emergency department: uncovering hidden patterns to improve patient flow.

One of the factors contributing to ED crowding is the lengthy delay in transferring an admitted patient from the ED to an inpatient department (ie, boarding time). An earlier start of the admission process using an automatic hospitalisation prediction model could potentially shorten these delays and reduce crowding.

Emergency department syndromic surveillance to investigate the health impact and factors associated with alcohol intoxication in Reunion Island.

In Reunion Island, alcohol is the most tried out psychoactive substance. To our knowledge, few indicators measuring the health burden of alcohol use exist on the island. In this context, an exploratory analysis based on syndromic surveillance data was implemented in order to describe the emergency department (ED) visits for alcohol intoxication (AI) and factors associated with their variations.An analysis of anonymized records routinely collected by the syndromic surveillance system was carried out. A daily...

The use of whole-body computed tomography in major trauma: variations in practice in UK trauma hospitals.

Whole-body CT (WBCT) use in patients with trauma in England and Wales is not well documented. WBCT in trauma can reduce time to definitive care, thereby increasing survival. However, its use varies significantly worldwide.

Non-traumatic incidental findings in patients undergoing whole-body computed tomography at initial emergency admission.

To evaluate the number, localisation and importance of non-traumatic incidental findings (IFs) in patients with suspected or obvious multiple trauma undergoing whole-body CT (WBCT) in a level-1 trauma centre.

Can surf-lifeguards perform a quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation sailing on a lifeboat? A quasi-experimental study.

Drowning is a high-priority public health problem around the world. The European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015 put special emphasis on special environments like open waters. Stopping the drowning process as soon as possible and starting an early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improve survival. Inflatable rescue boats (IRBs) are used around the world in the water rescue of drowning victims. Our objective was to test the quality of CPR performed by surf-lifeguards while sailing ...

A randomised experiment comparing low-cost ultrasound gel alternative with commercial gel.

Point-of-care ultrasound is a portable, relatively low-cost imaging modality with great potential utility in low-resource settings. However, commercially produced ultrasound gel is often cost-prohibitive and unavailable. We investigated whether images obtained using an alternative cornstarch-based gel would be of comparable quality with those using commercial gel.

Can emergency medicine research benefit from adaptive design clinical trials?

Adaptive design clinical trials use preplanned interim analyses to determine whether studies should be stopped or modified before recruitment is complete. Emergency medicine trials are well suited to these designs as many have a short time to primary outcome relative to the length of recruitment. We hypothesised that the majority of published emergency medicine trials have the potential to use a simple adaptive trial design.

An infraumbilical lump in a child.

ABCDE2…expose the eye.

BET 1: Screening for delirium within the emergency department.

A shortcut review was carried out to see if the abbreviated mental test score was better than other cognitive screening tools to diagnose delirium in the ED. Fourteen papers were identified reporting on 10 separate ED studies. Only one small study used the abbreviated mental test score and did not compare the diagnostic performance to any other test. There is very little published research on the use of the abbreviated mental test score in the ED setting.

Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: Best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary.

BET 2: Acupuncture and fibromyalgia.

A shortcut review was carried out to see if acupuncture is an effective pain treatment in fibromyalgia. One Cochrane review and five subsequent papers and conference abstracts were identified. There are no large studies addressing this question and acupuncture has been compared with many different treatment modalities. Acupuncture may be a valid treatment for pain in fibromyalgia, but more research is required to validate this.

A practical approach to Events Medicine provision.

In the past three decades, mass casualty incidents have occurred worldwide at multiple sporting events and other mass gatherings. Organisational safety and healthcare provision can consequently be scrutinised post-event. Within the UK, such incidents in the 1980s provided incentives to improve medical services and subsequent high profile UK-based international sporting events (London Olympics and Paralympics 2012, Glasgow Commonwealth Games 2014, Rugby World Cup 2015) added a further catalyst for developing...

Diagnostic accuracy of the APPY1 Test in patients aged 2-20 years with suspected acute appendicitis presenting to emergency departments.

Evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the APPY1 Test alone and in combination with the Alvarado score (AS) to rule out acute appendicitis (AA) in patients presenting to EDs with abdominal pain suspicious for AA.

Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in acute care: a strong marker of disease presence and severity, readmission and mortality. A retrospective cohort study.

Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is an inflammatory biomarker associated with presence and progression of disease and with increased risk of mortality. We aimed to evaluate the unspecific biomarker suPAR as a prognostic marker in patients admitted to acute care.

Management of critical illness with non-invasive ventilation by an Australian HEMS.

Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) therapy is widely used for the management of acute respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to investigate the current use of NIV during interhospital retrievals in an Australian physician-led aeromedical service.

Exploring the relationship between general practice characteristics, and attendance at walk-in centres, minor injuries units and EDs in England 2012/2013: a cross-sectional study.

For several years, EDs in the UK NHS have faced considerable increases in attendance rates. Walk-in centres (WiCs) and minor injuries units (MIUs) have been suggested as solutions. We aimed to investigate the associations between practice and practice population characteristics with ED attendance rates or combined ED/WiC/MIU attendance, and the associations between WiC/MIU and ED attendance.


Quick Search
Advertisement