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PubMed Journal Database | Science (New York, N.Y.) RSS

16:23 EDT 28th May 2017 | BioPortfolio

The US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health manage PubMed.gov which comprises of more than 21 million records, papers, reports for biomedical literature, including MEDLINE, life science and medical journals, articles, reviews, reports and  books.  BioPortfolio aims to publish relevant information on published papers, clinical trials and news associated with users selected topics.

For example view all recent relevant publications on Epigenetics and associated publications and clincial trials.

Showing PubMed Articles 1–25 of 5,700+ from Science (New York, N.Y.)

Strong coupling of a single electron in silicon to a microwave photon.

Silicon is vital to the computing industry due to the high quality of its native oxide and well-established doping technologies. Isotopic purification, and the resulting seconds-long quantum coherence times, have recently put Si at the forefront of efforts to create a solid state quantum processor. Here we demonstrate strong coupling of a single electron in a silicon double quantum dot to the photonic field of a microwave cavity, as shown by the observation of vacuum Rabi splitting. Strong coupling of a qua...

Nanometer resolution imaging and tracking of fluorescent molecules with minimal photon fluxes.

We introduce MINFLUX, a concept for localizing photon emitters in space. By probing the emitter with a local intensity minimum of excitation light, MINFLUX minimizes the fluorescence photons needed for high localization precision. A 22-fold reduction of photon detections over that required in popular centroid-localization is demonstrated. In superresolution microscopy, MINFLUX attained ~1-nm precision, resolving molecules only 6 nm apart. Tracking single fluorescent proteins by MINFLUX increased the tempora...

Evolutionary drivers of thermoadaptation in enzyme catalysis.

With early life likely to have existed in a hot environment, enzymes had to cope with an inherent drop in catalytic speed caused by lowered temperature. Here we characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying thermoadaptation of enzyme catalysis in adenylate kinase using ancestral sequence reconstruction spanning 3 billion years of evolution. We show that evolution solved the enzyme's key kinetic obstacle-how to maintain catalytic speed on a cooler Earth-by exploiting transition-state heat capacity. Tracin...

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Comment on "A histone acetylation switch regulates H2A.Z deposition by the SWR-C remodeling enzyme".

Watanabe et al (Reports, 12 April 2013, p. 195) study the yeast SWR1/SWR-C complex responsible for depositing the histone variant H2A.Z by replacing nucleosomal H2A with H2A.Z. They report that reversal of H2A.Z replacement is mediated by SWR1 and related INO80 on an H2A.Z nucleosome carrying H3K56Q. Using multiple assays and reaction conditions, we find no evidence of such reversal of H2A.Z exchange.

Response to Comment on "A histone acetylation switch regulates H2A.Z deposition by the SWR-C remodeling enzyme".

Wang et al report a failure to reproduce our biochemical observation that the INO80C and SWR1C/SWR1/SWR-C chromatin remodeling enzymes catalyze replacement of nucleosomal H2A.Z with H2A when the substrate contains H3-K56Q. They point to technical problems with our dimer exchange assay. In response, we have recapitulated our findings using a mobility shift assay that was developed and employed by Wang and colleagues.


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