Cryoablation Versus Radiofrequency Ablation

14:16 EDT 30th October 2014 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The purpose of this retrospective study is to describe why and when we used cryo and why we crossed over when we used both RFA and cryo. It is also to determine if there is some predictor that would make us say one patient would be better served with one technique than another and to describe our overall acute success rate and then our 6-month recurrence rate with cryo ablation and compare it to our known success rate with RFA.

Description

Cryotherapy (Cryo) is a new ablation energy source used instead of the radiofrequency (RFA) method for ablation of septal pathways. In the past year, we have used cryo approximately 50 times, however 50% of the cryo procedures crossed over from RFA to cryo or cryo to RFA. It appears to me that cryo use should be as an adjunct therapy to RFA instead of replacement of RFA.

I would like to describe why and when we used cryo and why we crossed over when we used both RFA and cryo. I would like to determine if there is some predictor that would make us say one patient would be better served with one technique than another. I would also describe our overall acute success rate and then our 6-month recurrence rate with cryo ablation and compare it to our known success rate with RFA. All of this can be done with a chart review.

This will be done through a retrospective study.

Study Design

Observational Model: Defined Population, Observational Model: Natural History, Time Perspective: Longitudinal, Time Perspective: Retrospective

Conditions

Congenital Disorders

Location

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
Atlanta
Georgia
United States
30322

Status

Terminated

Source

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

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