Cardioversion vs. Catheter Ablation for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

11:25 EDT 28th August 2014 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The aim of this randomized study is to evaluate the efficacy of two different approaches for conversion of persistent atrial fibrillation, the non-invasive one (external electrical cardioversion) and the invasive one (catheter ablation).

Description

This randomized study compares two treatment strategies in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation: Cardioversion vs. catheter ablation. Cardioversion is a low risk standard treatment option for patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. However, mid- and long term efficacy (regarding the maintenance of sinus rhythm) is low. Catheter ablation is an invasive treatment which has been reported to result in up to 60-70% of patients in stable sinus rhythm. However, it is a potentially dangerous invasive procedure with potentially fatal complications.

Comparison: External cardioversion vs. catheter ablation

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Control: Active Control, Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Atrial Fibrillation

Intervention

catheter ablation, external electric cardioversion

Location

Deutsches Herzzentrum Muenchen
Munich
Germany
80636

Status

Recruiting

Source

Deutsches Herzzentrum Muenchen

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

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PubMed Articles [4640 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Rapid, irregular atrial contractions caused by a block of electrical impulse conduction in the right atrium and a reentrant wave front traveling up the inter-atrial septum and down the right atrial free wall or vice versa. Unlike ATRIAL FIBRILLATION which is caused by abnormal impulse generation, typical atrial flutter is caused by abnormal impulse conduction. As in atrial fibrillation, patients with atrial flutter cannot effectively pump blood into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES).

A condition caused by dysfunctions related to the SINOATRIAL NODE including impulse generation (CARDIAC SINUS ARREST) and impulse conduction (SINOATRIAL EXIT BLOCK). It is characterized by persistent BRADYCARDIA, chronic ATRIAL FIBRILLATION, and failure to resume sinus rhythm following CARDIOVERSION. This syndrome can be congenital or acquired, particularly after surgical correction for heart defects.

A cardiotonic glycoside obtained mainly from Digitalis lanata; it consists of three sugars and the aglycone DIGOXIGENIN. Digoxin has positive inotropic and negative chronotropic activity. It is used to control ventricular rate in ATRIAL FIBRILLATION and in the management of congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation. Its use in congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm is less certain. The margin between toxic and therapeutic doses is small. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p666)

Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.

Placement of a balloon-tipped catheter into the pulmonary artery through the antecubital, subclavian, and sometimes the femoral vein. It is used to measure pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure which reflects left atrial pressure and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. The catheter is threaded into the right atrium, the balloon is inflated and the catheter follows the blood flow through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle and out into the pulmonary artery.

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