Study of Adrenal Gland Tumors

11:23 EDT 22nd October 2014 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The adrenal glands, located atop the kidneys, normally produce several types of hormones. Tumors of these glands may or may not secrete hormones. It is not known what causes these tumors or why some secrete hormones and others do not. Some of the tumors are benign and confined to the adrenal gland, and others are malignant (cancerous), and can spread to other parts of the body. This study will investigate how adrenal gland tumors develop, why some secrete steroid hormones and others do not, and why some are benign and others malignant.

Patients between 3 and 70 years old with a known or suspected adrenal gland tumor may be eligible for this study. Participants will be hospitalized for 7 to 10 days for various tests and procedures that may include the following:

1. Medical history and physical examination, including body measurements, as appropriate. Children and adolescents will have Tanner staging, including examination of the genitals, to determine the extent of sexual maturity.

2. 24-hour urine collection to measure hormones in the urine.

3. Imaging studies, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, computed tomography (CT) and other X-ray studies.

4. Blood tests to see if the tumor secretes hormones in response to specific stimuli, including exercise, food, and various hormones. The hormones are given through an intravenous catheter, or IV-a thin plastic tube inserted into an arm vein. After the stimulus, blood is drawn through the same IV every 30 minutes for up to 3 hours to measure hormone levels. Based on the results of these tests, some patients may have additional blood tests to check hormone response to special foods, an IV salt solution, or other hormones or drugs given either IV or by mouth (in pill form).

5. Photographs to document the effects on the body of abnormal hormone secretion from the adrenal tumor.

6. Small samples of blood and tumor tissue for research and DNA (genetic) analysis.

A discussion of treatment options will be based on the results of tests. If surgery to remove the tumor is recommended, the procedure can be done at NIH under this study protocol. If a malignant tumor is found that cannot be treated surgically, chemotherapy or radiation therapy may be recommended. These options are not offered under this protocol, but may be available under a different NIH study (for example, at the National Cancer Institute). Referrals will be made at the patient's request.

Patients who had surgery may be followed at the NIH outpatient clinic for 1 year after surgery. Patients with certain types of tumors may continue to be followed at NIH once a year for up to 5 years.

A registry of study participants will be created to keep records and correlate medical histories with tissues kept at NIH. The registry will also be used to inform participants of research studies they may be interested in. No individuals or organizations outside of NIH will have access to the registry.

Description

The adrenal glands are the major source in the body of the steroid hormones. In normal physiology, the pituitary hormone ACTH regulates the secretion of glucocorticoids, while the secretion of mineralocorticoids is controlled by the renin-angiotensin system. In addition to these two steroids, the adrenal gland secretes lesser amounts of intermediate metabolites of these steroids, as well as the sex-steroids DHEA, DHEAS, androstenedione, testosterone, estrogen, and estrone. Dysregulated secretion of any of these hormones can be caused by sporadic adrenocortical adenomas or carcinomas, with the development of specific clinical syndromes depending on the identity of the hormones secreted. Similar clinical phenomena can also occur in the setting of a primary, bilateral hyperplasia of the adrenal cortex. In at least a subset of cortisol-producing adrenocortical neoplasms, the presence of ectopic or abnormal receptors has been described, resulting in the regulation of cortisol by non-physiologic stimuli. The present study will serve as a mechanism to investigate individuals with steroid hormone-secreting adrenocortical tumors of all types for the purpose of identifying hereditary, congenital, or acquired defects leading not only to hormone oversecretion, but also to tumor formation. The first goal of the study will be to examine the prevalence of ectopic receptor expression in hormone secreting adrenocortical tumors. This aim will aid in the understanding of the ontogeny of these tumors, as well as lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies (e.g., receptor antagonists) to control hormone oversecretion. The second goal of the study will be to perform a comparative analysis of the expression of large sets of genes using the emerging technology of gene array/gene chip analysis. This study will generate important diagnostic information about the malignant potential of adrenocortical neoplasms, information which at present can only be obtained through follow-up of patients and retrospective analysis. This information may help to identify patients who would benefit from more aggressive intervention strategies. Thirdly, this study will also provide for the establishment of a bank of tissues of varying malignant potential from the adrenal cortex, which may serve in the future as an experimental resource to test new diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

Study Design

N/A

Conditions

Adrenal Gland Neoplasm

Location

National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, 9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda
Maryland
United States
20892

Status

Recruiting

Source

National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

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PubMed Articles [1619 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

A rare cavernous hemangioma of the adrenal gland.

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Conditions in which the production of adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS falls below the requirement of the body. Adrenal insufficiency can be caused by defects in the ADRENAL GLANDS, the PITUITARY GLAND, or the HYPOTHALAMUS.

Neoplasm derived from displaced cells (rest cells) of the primordial ADRENAL GLANDS, generally in patients with CONGENITAL ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA. Adrenal rest tumors have been identified in TESTES; LIVER; and other tissues. They are dependent on ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN for growth and adrenal steroid secretion.

The inner portion of the adrenal gland. Derived from ECTODERM, adrenal medulla consists mainly of CHROMAFFIN CELLS that produces and stores a number of NEUROTRANSMITTERS, mainly adrenaline (EPINEPHRINE) and NOREPINEPHRINE. The activity of the adrenal medulla is regulated by the SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM.

A pair of glands located at the cranial pole of each of the two KIDNEYS. Each adrenal gland is composed of two distinct endocrine tissues with separate embryonic origins, the ADRENAL CORTEX producing STEROIDS and the ADRENAL MEDULLA producing NEUROTRANSMITTERS.

Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.

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