Imaging Techniques in MRI

2014-08-26 22:13:26 | BioPortfolio



- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans must be performed according to specified sets of parameters that provide optimal images of each organ and each area of the body. These scanning parameters are often specific to the institution or organization at which they are employed, and may also depend on the manufacturer of the MRI scanning equipment. Because MRI scanning equipment is always being updated and upgraded, researchers are interested in developing new and optimized scanning parameters for MRI scans.


- To improve current methods and develop new techniques for magnetic resonance imaging.


- Individuals 18 years of age and older who are either volunteers or current NIH protocol participants.

- Participants must not have any medical history factors (e.g., extreme claustrophobia, history of metal implants) that would prevent them from receiving MRI scans.


- Participants will have at least one MRI scan that will last from 20 minutes to 2 hours (most scans will last between 45 and 90 minutes). The total time commitment for most visits will be approximately 4 hours from start to finish.

- Some MRI techniques require standard monitoring equipment or specific procedures during the scanning, such as an electrocardiogram.

- Participants will have blood samples taken at the time of the scan. Some MRI studies will require the use of a contrast agent that will be administered during the scan.

- Volunteers may be asked to return for additional MRI scans over the course of a few years. Follow-up scans may be done on the same part of the body or on different parts of the body. No more than one MRI scan will be performed in any 4-week period for this protocol....


Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging performed on volunteers will be used to develop and optimize techniques useful in the advancement of MRI technology. The results will be used to evaluate the performance of new imaging methods and equipment on human subjects, and to provide essential ground work for research and development for use in future patients . MR imaging is a non invasive technology, though some scans, dependent on imaging area and researcher preference, may be performed with MR contrast -- gadolinium (Gd) -- given intravenously.

Study Design

Time Perspective: Prospective


Magnetic Resonance Imaging


National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, 9000 Rockville Pike
United States




National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)

Results (where available)

View Results


Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-26T22:13:26-0400

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PubMed Articles [9831 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Brain Tumors.

Magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful, noninvasive imaging technique with exquisite sensitivity to soft tissue composition. Magnetic resonance imaging is primary tool for brain tumor diagnosis, eva...

Emerging Role of MRI for Radiation Treatment Planning in Lung Cancer.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides excellent soft-tissue contrast and allows for specific scanning sequences to optimize differentiation between various tissue types and properties. Moreover, i...

Value of MRI and MRS fat measurements to complement conventional screening methods for childhood obesity.

To evaluate a protocol combining abdominal fat-water magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and liver single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) for studies of childhood obesity.

Prostate Cancer: The Role of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging has been increasingly used for detection, localization and staging of prostate cancer over the last years. It combines high-resolution T2 Weighted-Imaging an...

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

The use of molecularly targeted imaging probes to localize and/or monitor biochemical and cellular processes via various imaging modalities that include RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; ULTRASONOGRAPHY; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; fluorescence imaging; and MICROSCOPY.

A technique applicable to the wide variety of substances which exhibit paramagnetism because of the magnetic moments of unpaired electrons. The spectra are useful for detection and identification, for determination of electron structure, for study of interactions between molecules, and for measurement of nuclear spins and moments. (From McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, 7th edition) Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy is a variant of the technique which can give enhanced resolution. Electron spin resonance analysis can now be used in vivo, including imaging applications such as MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING.

Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).

A type of MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING that uses only one nuclear spin excitation per image and therefore can obtain images in a fraction of a second rather than the minutes required in traditional MRI techniques. It is used in a variety of medical and scientific applications.

The creation of a visual display of the inside of the entire body of a human or animal for the purposes of diagnostic evaluation. This is most commonly achieved by using MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; or POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY.

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