Language Treatment for Progressive Aphasia

13:03 EST 28th November 2014 | BioPortfolio

Summary

Progressive aphasia is characterized by a steady and progressive loss of language skills in the presence of relatively preserved memory, attention, and thinking. The aim of this study is to slow the progression of language decline in progressive aphasia via language therapy. The first goal of this study is to improve naming abilities of individuals with progressive aphasia. This will be accomplished by carrying out an intensive treatment program for anomia. The second goal is to evaluate whether this intense language treatment re-activates affected areas and/or connections within the language network, using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (to measure neural activity in specific brain regions) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging tractography (to measure the connectivity between specific brain regions). This is the first study on progressive aphasia addressing both treatment and imaging in the same patients.

Study Design

Allocation: Non-Randomized, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Open Label

Conditions

Primary Progressive Aphasia

Intervention

Errorless learning

Location

Baycrest
Toronto
Ontario
Canada
M6A 2E1

Status

Recruiting

Source

Baycrest

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Clinical Trials [309 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Language in Primary Progressive Aphasia

The purpose of this study is to further define the neurological and linguistic deterioration in primary progressive aphasia.

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This study is a comparison of 3 learning techniques, Errorless learning, modelling and trial and error, in the relearning of IADL of Alzheimer patients from mild to moderately severe demen...

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In this study the investigators are examining the effectiveness of two different speech therapy protocols for word retrieval impairments experienced by individuals with stroke-induced apha...

Dopaminergic Enhancement of Learning and Memory in Aphasia

The purpose of this study is to determine whether levodopa, in combination with a high frequency language training, is effective in boosting naming performance in patients with aphasia.

Dosage and Predictors of Naming Treatment Response in Aphasia

This study examines aphasia treatment response among veterans and non-veterans living with aphasia. It seeks to identify cognitive and neural factors which are predictive of positive respo...

PubMed Articles [11019 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Crossed aphasia and preserved visuospatial functions in logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia.

Neuroimaging in the differential diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia - illustrative case series in the light of new diagnostic criteria.

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a progressive language disorder associated with atrophy of the dominant language hemisphere, typically left. Current PPA criteria divide PPA into three variants: n...

Asymmetry and heterogeneity of Alzheimer's and frontotemporal pathology in primary progressive aphasia.

Fifty-eight autopsies of patients with primary progressive aphasia are reported. Twenty-three of these were previously described (Mesulam et al., 2008) but had their neuropathological diagnoses update...

Primary progressive aphasia: Linguistic patterns and clinical variants.

We investigated whether primary progressive aphasias (PPA) reflect non-random degradation of linguistic dimensions that might be supported by different neural subsystems and to what extent this degrad...

Logopenic, mixed, or Alzheimer-related aphasia?

This study tested the hypothesis that patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) who do not meet the proposed criteria for any of the recognized subtypes would have the atrophy pattern reported i...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A form of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and a progressive form of dementia characterized by motor speech impairment and AGRAMMATISM, with relative sparing of single word comprehension and semantic memory.

Heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy associated with neuronal loss, gliosis, and dementia. Patients exhibit progressive changes in social, behavioral, and/or language function. Multiple subtypes or forms are recognized based on presence or absence of TAU PROTEIN inclusions. FTLD includes three clinical syndromes: FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA, semantic dementia, and PRIMARY PROGRESSIVE NONFLUENT APHASIA.

A progressive form of dementia characterized by the global loss of language abilities and initial preservation of other cognitive functions. Fluent and nonfluent subtypes have been described. Eventually a pattern of global cognitive dysfunction, similar to ALZHEIMER DISEASE, emerges. Pathologically, there are no Alzheimer or PICK DISEASE like changes, however, spongiform changes of cortical layers II and III are present in the TEMPORAL LOBE and FRONTAL LOBE. (From Brain 1998 Jan;121(Pt 1):115-26)

A form of multiple sclerosis characterized by a progressive deterioration in neurologic function which is in contrast to the more typical relapsing remitting form. If the clinical course is free of distinct remissions, it is referred to as primary progressive multiple sclerosis. When the progressive decline is punctuated by acute exacerbations, it is referred to as progressive relapsing multiple sclerosis. The term secondary progressive multiple sclerosis is used when relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis evolves into the chronic progressive form. (From Ann Neurol 1994;36 Suppl:S73-S79; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914)

A type of fluent aphasia characterized by an impaired ability to repeat one and two word phrases, despite retained comprehension. This condition is associated with dominant hemisphere lesions involving the arcuate fasciculus (a white matter projection between Broca's and Wernicke's areas) and adjacent structures. Like patients with Wernicke aphasia (APHASIA, WERNICKE), patients with conduction aphasia are fluent but commit paraphasic errors during attempts at written and oral forms of communication. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p482; Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p142; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p848)

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