Advertisement

Topics

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Hyperarousal Symptoms Treated With Physiological Stress Management

2014-07-24 14:14:08 | BioPortfolio

Summary

Hyperarousal is a key symptom of PTSD. Even after receiving trauma-focused therapy, PTSD patients may continue to suffer from hyperarousal. Our main objectives are to measure hyperarousal in VA outpatients with PTSD related to combat experience in the last 10 years and to test the efficacy of physiological relaxation training in reducing this hyperarousal. Measurements will be both physiological, using 24 hour ambulatory monitoring of skin conductance, heart rate, and physical activity during waking and sleeping, and psychological, using self-reports and clinician interviews. Specific aims include initially evaluating 100 or more PTSD patients for the severity of their hyperarousal symptoms. Of these, 50 with at least moderate hyperarousal who either have participated in a trauma-focused therapy or have declined to participate in such a therapy will be recruited for a therapy trial. Volunteers will be randomized to treatment consisting of 5 sessions of individual physiological relaxation training with biofeedback over a 4-week period or to a 2-month waiting period after which they also may receive this therapy. Physiological evaluations of the patients' ability to relax will be measured at three times -before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 6 months after treatment. Clinical evaluations by interviews and questionnaires on measures of symptoms and disability will be measured at four times - before treatment, immediately after treatment, 1 month after treatment, and 6 months after treatment. The waiting-list group and a nonanxious control group will be tested psychophysiologically twice at the same interval as the patients before and immediately after treatment. A control group will allow us to calibrate our measures in the setting in which they are being applied. We hypothesize that this therapy will relieve both self-reported and objective, physiological symptoms of hyperarousal.

Relevance to health and the VA mission: Many of our clients at the VA Palo Alto Mental Health Outpatient Services for PTSD are veterans of Iraq, who need help with hyperarousal symptoms. This study will fill in gaps in our knowledge about the physiology of these symptoms and about the efficacy of relaxation therapies. Non-pharmacological treatments like the ones that we propose may relieve patients' hyperarousal to an extent that they are less tempted to turn to alcohol or sedative drugs.

Description

Hyperarousal is a key symptom of PTSD. Even after receiving trauma-focused therapy, PTSD patients may continue to suffer from hyperarousal. Neuroimaging findings in PTSD support the idea that regulation of autonomic arousal from the cingulate cortex can be helpful in reducing anxiety.

Our main objectives are to measure hyperarousal in VA outpatients with PTSD related to combat experience in the last 10 years and to test the efficacy of physiological relaxation training in reducing this hyperarousal. Measurements will be both physiological, using 24 hour ambulatory monitoring of skin conductance, heart rate, and physical activity during waking and sleeping, and psychological, using self-reports and clinician interviews. Specific aims include initially evaluating 100 or more PTSD patients for the severity of their hyperarousal symptoms. Of these, 50 with at least moderate hyperarousal who either have participated in a trauma-focused therapy or have declined to participate in such a therapy will be recruited for a therapy trial. Volunteers will be randomized to treatment consisting of 5 sessions of individual physiological relaxation training with electromyographic feedback and with capnographic feedback over a 4-week period or to a 2-month waiting period after which they also may receive this therapy. Physiological evaluations of the patients' ability to relax while sitting quietly and their arousal levels during daily activities and sleep will be measured at three times -before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 6 months after treatment. Clinical evaluations by interviews and questionnaires on measures of symptoms and disability will be measured at four times - before treatment, immediately after treatment, 1 month after treatment, and 6 months after treatment. The waiting-list group and a nonanxious control group will be tested psychophysiologically twice at the same interval as the patients before and immediately after treatment. A control group will allow us to calibrate our measures in the setting in which they are being applied. We hypothesize that this therapy will relieve both self-reported and objective, physiological symptoms of hyperarousal.

Relevance to health and the VA mission: Many of our clients at the VA Palo Alto Mental Health Outpatient Services for PTSD are veterans of Iraq, who need help with hyperarousal symptoms. This study will fill in gaps in our knowledge about the physiology of these symptoms and about the efficacy of relaxation therapies. Non-pharmacological treatments like the ones that we propose may relieve patients' hyperarousal to an extent that they are less tempted to turn to alcohol or sedative drugs. Physiological proof of the effectiveness of relaxation procedures in this clinical group would help convince clinicians to apply them and patient consumers to try them.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Diagnostic

Conditions

Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic

Intervention

relaxation training, No intervention

Location

VA Palo Alto Health Care System
Palo Alto
California
United States
94304-1290

Status

Recruiting

Source

Department of Veterans Affairs

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-07-24T14:14:08-0400

Clinical Trials [3066 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Effectiveness of Three Different Psychotherapies for Chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

This study will examine whether interpersonal psychotherapy is as effective in treating post-traumatic stress disorder as the established therapies of prolonged exposure and relaxation.

Neural Correlates of Cognitive Rehabilitation in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an emotional disorder that can also lead to problems with attention and memory. Cognitive training has been successfully used to improve attention...

Psychological First Aid (PFA): RCT Adults Non-intentional Trauma Emergency Room

Psychological First Aid (PFA) is currently the most recommended early intervention for people affected by recent traumatic events, especially in the aftermath of natural disasters. Unfortu...

Civilian Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Risperidone Clinical Trial

The purpose of this study is to determine whether the administration of risperidone is effective in the treatment of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-resistant post-traumatic ...

Prevention of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Following Trauma by Attention Control Training

The purpose of this study is to explore the efficacy of Attention Control Training in preventing the development of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), during the period near after a tr...

PubMed Articles [23319 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

A prospective study of pre-trauma risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

It is unclear which potentially modifiable risk factors best predict post-trauma psychiatric disorders. We aimed to identify pre-trauma risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or major ...

Pharmacologic management of comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder and addictions.

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUD) frequently co-occur, and their combination can increase poor health outcomes as well as mortality.

Best practice intervention for post-traumatic stress disorder among transit workers.

Transportation industry workers are at high risk for exposure to traumatic incidents in the workplace. A considerable number of those exposed to such incidents will develop post-traumatic stress disor...

Telomere length and telomere repeating factors: Cellular markers for post-traumatic stress disorder-like model.

The aim of the present study was to explore the telomere length of peripheral blood leukocytes from a rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as well as the expression level of telomere-bi...

Relations Between Cognitive Functioning and Alcohol Use, Craving, and Post-Traumatic Stress: An Examination Among Trauma-Exposed Military Veterans With Alcohol Use Disorder.

Cognitive dysfunction is commonly observed among individuals with alcohol use disorder (AUD) and trauma exposure and is, in turn, associated with worse clinical outcomes. Accordingly, disruptions in c...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A class of traumatic stress disorders that is characterized by the significant dissociative states seen immediately after overwhelming trauma. By definition it cannot last longer than 1 month, if it persists, a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (STRESS DISORDERS, POST-TRAUMATIC) is more appropriate.

A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.

Anxiety disorders manifested by the development of characteristic symptoms following a psychologically traumatic event that is outside the normal range of usual human experience. Symptoms include re-experiencing the traumatic event, increased arousal, and numbing of responsiveness to or reduced involvement with the external world. Traumatic stress disorders can be further classified by the time of onset and the duration of these symptoms.

Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.

Dyssomnias (i.e., insomnias or hypersomnias) associated with dysfunction of internal sleep mechanisms or secondary to a sleep-related medical disorder (e.g., sleep apnea, post-traumatic sleep disorders, etc.). (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)

More From BioPortfolio on "Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Hyperarousal Symptoms Treated With Physiological Stress Management"

Quick Search
Advertisement
 

Relevant Topics

Stress
Stress is caused by your perception of situations around you and then the reaction of your body to them. The automatic stress response to unexpected events is known as 'fight or flight'. Discovered by Walter Cannon in 1932, it is the release of h...

Anxiety Disorders
Anxiety is caused by stress. It is a natural reaction, and is beneficial in helping us deal with tense situations and pressure. It is deterimental when is becomes an excessive, irrational dread of everyday situations. The most common types of anxiety di...


Searches Linking to this Trial