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A Comparison of Monosyn and Monocryl Sutures in Surgical Wounds

2014-07-23 21:20:50 | BioPortfolio

Summary

To better understand surgeon preference when using synthetic, absorbable, monofilament suture by comparing two similar appearing FDA-approved sutures, Monosyn (Aesculap) and Monocryl (Ethicon).

Description

Physicians have used suture to close wounds for at least 4,000 years. Archaeological records from ancient Egypt show that Egyptians used linen and animal sinew to close wounds. In ancient India, physicians used the pincers of beetles or ants to staple wounds shut. They then cut the insects' bodies off, leaving their jaws (staples) in place. Other natural materials used to close wounds include flax, hair, grass, cotton, silk, pig bristles, and animal gut.

The fundamental principles of wound closure have changed little over 4,000 years. Successful closure of wound involves surgical techniques coupled with knowledge of the physical characteristics and handling of the suture and needle. The selection of proper suture material in closing any surgical defect is important in wound healing, minimizing infection, and achieving optimal cosmetic and functional results.

A great deal of progress has been made since Egyptian times with regard to suture materials and manufacturing processes. Today, sutures are available with a wide variety of characteristics, configuration, manipulability, coefficient of friction, solubility, strength, and immunogenic properties. Yet, sutures are currently rather crudely classified based on a numeric scale according to diameter and tensile strength; descending from 10 to 1, and then descending again from 1-0 to 12-0. This study aims to explore the factors that are important to a surgeon when choosing sutures via evaluating surgeon preference for two types of synthetic, absorbable, monofilament sutures: Monosyn and Monocryl. We hope to initiate a more nuanced exploration of how suture characteristics influence surgeon preference, beyond filament type and size, and how makers of suture may better report and represent these factors.

Study Design

Observational Model: Case Control, Time Perspective: Prospective

Conditions

Wounds

Intervention

Absorable, monofilament sutures: Monosyn and Monocryl

Location

Tufts Medical Center
Boston
Massachusetts
United States
02111

Status

Completed

Source

Tufts Medical Center

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-07-23T21:20:50-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.

Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.

Devices used to hold tissue structures together for repair, reconstruction or to close wounds. They may consist of adsorbable or non-adsorbable, natural or synthetic materials. They include tissue adhesives, skin tape, sutures, buttons, staples, clips, screws, etc., each designed to conform to various tissue geometries.

Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.

Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.

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