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Latest "Panobinostat And Epirubicin In Treating Patients With Metastatic Malignant Solid Tumors" News Stories - Page: 20

07:44 EDT 21st March 2019 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Panobinostat And Epirubicin In Treating Patients With Metastatic Malignant Solid Tumors" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

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Showing "Panobinostat Epirubicin Treating Patients With Metastatic Malignant Solid" News Articles 476–500 of 23,000+

Monday 18th March 2019

Karuna Announces $68 Million Series B Financing

Proceeds will be used to advance clinical development of lead product candidate, KarXT, for additional indications beyond the ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial in schizophrenia and for expansion of the pipeline Karuna Therapeutics, Inc. (“Karuna,” formerly Karuna


Roche to present results of the largest safety study of its kind with Tecentriq (atezolizumab) in patients with metastatic bladder cancer

Roche today announced first results from SAUL, a Phase IIIb study evaluating the safety of Tecentriq® in approximately 1000 patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma (mUC) including several clinically relevant populations reflective of real-world clinical practice (patients with renal impairment, poor performance status (ECOG PS 2), treated asymptomatic CNS metastases, sta...

Medicines Only Work if Patients Can Afford Them: Solutions For The High Drug Prices Era

New drug therapies help people live longer, better lives. But in a world of increasing health costs, prescribing life-saving medications for our patients isn’t enough. Physicians, health plans and pharmaceutical manufacturers have to ensure that patients can afford to take them, as well.


Sunday 17th March 2019

BFR therapy as part of rehabilitation following ACL surgery may slow bone loss

Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction patients often face bone and muscle loss immediately following the procedure.

Study reveals another surgical option for patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears

The arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction (SCR) surgical technique offers patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears restored shoulder function and the opportunity to return to sports and physically-demanding work, according to research presented today at the AOSSM/AANA Specialty Day in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Coronary artery calcium indicates patients' imminent risk of a heart attack

About six million people come into an emergency department every year with chest pain, but not all of them are having a heart attack -- and many are not even at risk or are at very low risk for having one.

Testosterone treatment lowers recurrence rates in low-risk prostate cancer patients

In the largest such study so far undertaken, US researchers have shown that testosterone replacement slows the recurrence of prostate cancer in low-risk patients.

FDA Gives Go Ahead to Novel Device That Treats Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

The FDA late last week approved marketing for a device (ClearMate) that can be used in emergency departments to treat patients for carbon monoxide poisoning...

CancerIQ Platform More than Doubles Number of Patients Identified as Eligible for MRI Surveillance to Detect Cancer Earlier

Riverside Healthcare presented data at the NCBC Conference, where CancerIQ also announced new partnership agreements with Cordata, MRS, and PenRad CHICAGO (PRWEB) March 17, 2019 Riverside Healthcare and Cancer IQ, Inc. presented the results of a 24-month study of a high-risk program to screen and identify women at elevated risk for hereditary cancer in the mammography setting at the National Cons...

Imugene doses first patients in trial of gastric cancer vaccine

Australian biotechnology firm Imugene has commenced dosing of patients in a Phase II clinical trial of its HER-Vaxx (IMU-131) cancer...Read More... The post Imugene doses first patients in trial of gastric cancer vaccine appeared first on Drug Development Technology.

EC approves Merck’s Keytruda for metastatic squamous NSCLC

The European Commission (EC) has approved Merck’s anti-PD-1 therapy Keytruda as a first-line treatment for adults with metastatic squamous non-small...Read More... The post EC approves Merck’s Keytruda for metastatic squamous NSCLC appeared first on Pharmaceutical Technology.

Molecular motors run in unison in a metal-organic framework

(University of Groningen) For molecular motors to be exploited effectively, they need to be able to operate in unison. However, integrating billions of these nanometre-sized motors into a single system, and getting them to operate in unison has proved to be quite a challenge. Organic chemists at the University of Groningen have now succeeded in integrating numerous unidirectional light-driven rota...

Karuna Snags $68 Million to Support Schizophrenia Treatment Development

The latest financing round will boost the study of KarXT, Karuna’s lead product candidate, which is currently in Phase II development as a potential treatment for acute psychosis in patients with schizophrenia.

Alcon Acquires PowerVision for $285 Million

Alcon said the acquisition of PowerVision demonstrates its commitment to bringing advanced technology intraocular lenses to cataract patients across the globe.

Dermira Skyrockets on Positive Phase II Results for Atopic Dermatitis Treatment

The stock is up more than 100 percent after the company announced positive results from a Phase IIb study of lebrikizumab, an investigational therapy, in adult patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis.

Prophylactic cranial irradiation: Improvements for advanced NSCLC

(NRG Oncology) Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI), a technique used to prevent the clinical development of brain metastases, is established as a standard approach for many patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) after initial therapy. While studies established that PCI decreases the incidence of brain metastases for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), ther...

Surgery using ultrasound energy found to treat high blood pressure

(Queen Mary University of London) A one-off operation that targets the nerves connected to the kidney has been found to maintain reduced blood pressure in hypertension patients for at least six months, according to the results of a clinical trial led in the UK by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust, and supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

Statin add-on may offer new/another option for reducing LDL-C in high-risk patients

(American College of Cardiology) Patients at high risk for a heart attack or stroke who took an investigational drug in addition to a statin had significantly lower LDL, or 'bad' cholesterol, after 12 weeks compared to similar patients who took a placebo in addition to statin therapy, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

Diabetes drug effective against heart failure in wide spectrum of patients

(American College of Cardiology) The cardiovascular benefits of the diabetes drug dapagliflozin extend across a wide spectrum of patients and are especially pronounced in those with reduced ejection fraction, a measure of the heart's pumping ability indicative of poor heart functioning, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

Ticagrelor is as safe and effective as clopidogrel after heart attack

(American College of Cardiology) Patients given clot busters to treat a heart attack fared equally well if they were given the standard blood thinning medication clopidogrel versus the newer, more potent drug ticagrelor, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

Stopping aspirin three months after stenting does not increase risk of death

(American College of Cardiology) Patients who stopped taking aspirin three months after receiving a stent to open the heart's arteries but continued taking a P2Y12 inhibitor -- clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor -- did not experience higher rates of death from any cause, heart attack or stroke after a year compared with those receiving standard therapy, according to research presented at the Ame...

Stopping DAPT after one-month improved outcomes in stent patients

(American College of Cardiology) Patients who stopped taking aspirin one month after receiving a stent in the heart's arteries but continued taking the P2Y12 inhibitor clopidogrel fared significantly better after one year compared with those who followed the standard practice of continuing both medications, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scienti...

Angiography timing does not impact survival after cardiac arrest for NSTEMI patients

(American College of Cardiology) In patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest who do not show evidence of the type of heart attack known as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), receiving immediate coronary angiography did not improve survival at 90 days compared to waiting a few days before undergoing the procedure, based on findings presented at the American College of Cardiology'...

Radial, femoral access for PCI found equal in terms of survival

(American College of Cardiology) Doctors can use either an artery in the arm (the radial approach) or in the groin (the femoral approach) to safely perform percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on patients presenting with a heart attack, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session. The research, which was stopped early, suggests the rad...

Low-risk patients may benefit from less invasive transcatheter valve replacement

(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) A new study by a team of cardiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) led by senior and corresponding author Jeffrey Popma, MD, suggests that a minimally invasive procedure currently reserved for patients too frail to undergo surgery may in fact be a safe and effective alternative for healthier patients.


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