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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from News-Medical.net

18:38 EST 9th December 2018 | BioPortfolio

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Showing News Articles 1–25 of 5,700+ from News-Medical.net

Sunday 9th December 2018

Retraction of article “Joy of cooking too much” from journal

In a short notification, the editors of the Annals of Internal Medicine have announced that they are retracting a letter called “The Joy of Cooking Too Much: 70 Years of Calorie Increases in Classic Recipes”. The article in question was published in 2009.

Friday 7th December 2018

Study quantifies links between alcohol, drug use and violent deaths

A group of researchers at the University of São Paulo's Medical School (FM-USP) in Brazil recently published the results of a study on the links between alcohol and drug use and the occurrence of violent deaths.

Researchers explore why and how Mediterranean diet may mitigate cardiovascular risk

A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health offers insights from a cohort study of women in the U.S. who reported consuming a Mediterranean-type diet.

Failure of critical cellular energy sensor responsible for CKD progression, study finds

Chronic kidney disease, an affliction characterized by progressive loss of kidney function, affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with multi-organ damage, cardiovascular disease, and muscle wasting.

Multigene test is a helpful decision making tool in breast cancer treatment, study shows

Multigene tests have been used in breast cancer treatment to assess the risk of metastasis for several years. A team at the Breast Cancer Center at the Technical University of Munich's Klinikum rechts der Isar has now presented results based on data collected in its routine clinical work.

MIT researchers develop antimicrobial peptides from South American wasp’s venom

The venom of insects such as wasps and bees is full of compounds that can kill bacteria. Unfortunately, many of these compounds are also toxic for humans, making it impossible to use them as antibiotic drugs.

Men with inflammatory bowel disease have higher prostate cancer risk

Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer, reports a 20-year study from Northwestern Medicine.

Study: Drug reduces hot flash frequency, improves quality of life in breast cancer survivors

Research led by oncologists Roberto Leon-Ferre, M.D. and Charles Loprinzi, M.D. of Mayo Clinic has found that the drug oxybutynin helps to reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flashes in women who are unable to take hormone replacement therapy, including breast cancer survivors.

Mount Sinai researcher awarded $2.5 million to advance understanding of neurodegenerative diseases

Ivan Marazzi, PhD, Assistant Professor of Microbiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, was awarded $2.5 million in funding by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to further the understanding of the underlying causes of neurodegenerative disorders such as Lou Gehrig's, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's diseases. The

Exercise program during adjuvant breast cancer treatment may provide cardiovascular benefits

Women who underwent a supervised program of cardiovascular exercise during adjuvant breast cancer treatment experienced better cardiovascular function than those who were not part of the exercise program, according to results of the EBBA-II trial presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 4-8.

New book encompasses the vast history of reproduction

A new book is the first to encompass the vast history of how living things procreate, from the banks of the ancient Nile to the fertility clinics of today.

Our brain senses angry voices in a flash, study shows

Sight and hearing are the two main sensory modalities allowing us to interact with our environment. But what happens within the brain when it perceives a threatening signal, such as an aggressive voice? How does it distinguish a threatening voice from the surrounding noise? How does it process this information? To answers these questions, researchers from the University of Geneva Switzerland, stud...

High intensity statin treatment and adherence could save more lives

Thousands of heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease could be prevented by patients taking higher doses of statins and taking the drugs as advised by doctors.

Scientists unravel how bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells

New research, from scientists at Imperial College London, unravels how so-called bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells, potentially opening new avenues to finding ways of clearing these bacterial cells from the body, and stopping recurrence of the bacterial infection.

Surgical choices may have long-term impact on quality of life for breast cancer patients

Even as more young women with breast cancer opt to have mastectomies, many experience a persistent decline in their sexual and psychosocial well-being following the procedure, as detailed in new research by Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center.

Many people at risk of heart disease and stroke have excess abdominal fat

Nearly two-thirds of people who are at high risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke have excess fat around the middle of the body (central obesity), according to findings from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) EUROASPIRE V survey.

Study reveals possible link between hysterectomy and brain function

A new preclinical study has shown that in the short term, some types of memory are affected following a hysterectomy.

Online CBT can help treat gastrointestinal disorders in children

Cognitive behavioral therapy online can be useful in treating gastrointestinal disorders in children when no physical cause can be found. This is the viewpoint of researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that is described in a new study published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Thursday 6th December 2018

Revolutionary dietary supplement aims to mitigate long term impact of alcohol consumption

Survivor is a revolutionary dietary supplement designed to boost your liver's response to alcohol, aimed at mitigating the negative impact it has on your body.

Capturing vital signs of patients with a cellphone camera

As biometric systems -- technologies which measure biological information to identify a person -- continue to advance, their potential impact on health care capabilities surge. Via tools such as fingerprint recognition, face recognition, iris and retina recognition, and vein recognition, health care workers are provided with increasingly sophisticated ways to monitor patients.

People covered by Michigan's expanded Medicaid program report improvements in health, finds study

Five states will expand Medicaid in 2019. Fourteen may start requiring Medicaid enrollees to work in return for their health coverage. And a new study could help all of these states understand what might be in store under these policies.

Black women with breast cancer have worse outcomes despite receiving equivalent treatments as white women

Even with equivalent treatments in women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, black women had significantly higher breast cancer recurrence and increased overall mortality compared to white women in a large phase III clinical trial, TAILORx, according to data presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 4-8.

Researchers confirm link between neonatal vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia

Newborns with vitamin D deficiency have an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life, a team of Australian and Danish researchers has reported.

VCU researchers test vaccine against opioid abuse

Virginia Commonwealth University researchers are testing a vaccine against opioid abuse developed by the Scripps Research Institute in California. The vaccine is meant to block the effects of heroin and fentanyl in patients with opioid use disorder.

Tweaking fitness apps to help people sustain workout routine

Fitness apps are easy to download and can help motivate people to start workout routines, but that may not be enough to sustain those routines in the long run. However, Penn State researchers suggest there may be ways to tweak those apps to inspire a deeper commitment to a fitness routine and help users hit their fitness goals.


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