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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Science Daily

15:33 EST 23rd January 2019 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Science Daily" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

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Showing News Articles 1–25 of 2,500+ from Science Daily

Wednesday 23rd January 2019

CRISPR/Cas9 used to control genetic inheritance in mice

Using active genetics technology, biologists have developed the world's first CRISPR/Cas9-based approach to control genetic inheritance in a mammal. The achievement in mice lays the groundwork for further advances based on this technology, including biomedical research on human disease. Future animal models may be possible of complex human genetic diseases, like arthritis and cancer, which are not...

Old cells repair damage in the brains of MS patients

A new study shows that there is a very limited regeneration of cells in the brain of patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). These findings underline the importance of treating MS at an early stage of the disease progression, when the affected cells can repair the damage as they are not replaced by new ones.

Unique form of chronic sinusitis in older patients

Older patients with a diagnosis of chronic sinusitis -- a disease of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses that often persists over many years -- have a unique inflammatory signature that may render them less responsive to steroid treatment, according to a new study.

It may be possible to restore memory function in Alzheimer's, preclinical study finds

New research reveals a new approach to Alzheimer's disease (AD) that may eventually make it possible to reverse memory loss, a hallmark of the disease in its late stages.

Suicide risk in people with autism

Researchers have conducted the first population-based study of suicidality in individuals with ASD in the United States. The 20-year retrospective study found that for individuals with autism, particularly females, the risk of suicide has increased through time compared to their non-autistic peers.

Tuesday 22nd January 2019

Outbreak of paralyzing disease linked to non-polio enterovirus

Using multiple genomic sequencing tests, TGen identified a specific non-polio enterovirus -- EV-D68 -- among at least four children, according to a new study. The finding is significant because AFM cases are continuing to increase and there has been no official recognition that this disease is being caused by EV-D68, which limits the research community's ability to develop preventative measures, s...

Materials chemists tap body heat to power 'smart garments'

Many wearable biosensors, data transmitters and similar tech advances for personalized health monitoring have now been 'creatively miniaturized,' says a materials chemist, but they require a lot of energy, and power sources can be bulky and heavy. Now researchers report that they have developed a fabric that can harvest body heat to power small wearable microelectronics such as activity trackers.

Machine learning could reduce testing, improve treatment for intensive care patients

Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients. To address this challenge, researchers are developing a computational approach to help clinicians more effectively monitor patients' conditions and make decisions about the best opportunities to order lab tests for specific patients.

Women, your inner circle may be key to gaining leadership roles

According to a new study, women who communicate regularly with a female-dominated inner circle are more likely to attain high-ranking leadership positions.

Ranger motivation in dangerous African park

A new study looks at the job satisfaction of front line conservation rangers working in challenging conditions at a national park in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and identifies ways to improve motivation to make them more effective at enforcing the law.

New explanation for Alexander the Great's death

Did Alexander the Great meet his demise more than 2,300 years ago because of the neurological disorder Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS)?

Diet low in added sugars significantly improves fatty liver disease in children

A randomized clinical study of adolescent boys with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) found that a diet low in free sugars (those sugars added to foods and beverages and occurring naturally in fruit juices) resulted in significant improvement in NAFLD compared to a usual diet.

Erasing memories associated with cocaine use reduces drug seeking behavior

Researchers identified the brain circuits that form memories associating environmental cues with cocaine use. Targeting these memories may improve the success of exposure therapy to prevent relapse.

Supplement makes (mouse) moms' milk better; pups benefit for life

Giving nursing mouse mothers a supplement called nicotinamide riboside (NR) promotes maternal weight loss, boosts milk production and quality, and leads to long-lasting physical, neurological, and behavioral benefits in the pups.

Possible link between rotavirus vaccine and decline in type 1 diabetes

A drop in the number of young children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes could be associated with the introduction of routine rotavirus vaccination of Australian infants, according to a new study.

Frequent use of aspirin can lead to increased bleeding, study finds

A new study has found that taking aspirin on a regular basis to prevent heart attacks and strokes, can lead to an increase risk of almost 50 percent in major bleeding episodes.

A tradeoff in the neural code

New research suggests that our brains are like modern washing machines -- evolved to have the latest sophisticated programming, but more vulnerable to breakdown and prone to develop costly disorders. Scientists conducted experiments comparing the efficiency of the neural code in non-human and human primates and found that as the neural code gets more efficient, the robustness that prevents errors ...

Multiple sclerosis: Helping cells to help themselves

Diseases such as multiple sclerosis are characterized by damage to the 'myelin sheath', a protective covering wrapped around nerve cells akin to insulation around an electrical wire. Researchers have discovered how the body initiates repair mechanisms which will limit the extent of any damage to this sheath. Their findings may provide a basis for the development of new drugs to treat multiple scle...

Surveillance in our schools, through commercial apps

ClassDojo is one of the most popular education apps in the world. Its company estimates it is used by millions of teachers and children across 180 countries. Beneath its friendly exterior lie disturbing implications.

Inability to integrate reward info contributes to undervalued rewards in schizophrenia

People with schizophrenia have a hard time integrating information about a reward -- the size of the reward and the probability of receiving it -- when assessing its value, according to a new study.

Long-read DNA analysis can give rise to errors

Advanced technologies that read long strings of DNA can produce flawed data that could affect genetic studies, research suggests.

Increasing skepticism against robots

In Europe, people are more reserved regarding robots than they were five years ago.

Synthetic flaxseed derivative helps heart function in septic mice

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that develops in response to infection. One of its major complications is cardiovascular dysfunction. Now, scientists show that a novel synthetic compound derived from flaxseed can reverse this and improve heart function in mice with sepsis.

Concussions linked to epilepsy development

Experiments show a strong relationship between changes in astrocytes after mild traumatic brain injury and the eventual occurrence of a seizure.

New genes associated with the leading cause of blindness

A new study identifies genes associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) that could represent new targets for future drug development.


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