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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Science Daily

06:11 EST 25th November 2017 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Science Daily" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

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Showing News Articles 1–25 of 3,100+ from Science Daily

Friday 24th November 2017

Promising new treatment for rare pregnancy cancer leads to remission in patients

Three out of four patients with the cancerous forms of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) went into remission after receiving the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab in a clinical trial, report researchers. The trial is the first to show that pembrolizumab can be used to successfully treat women with GTD.

Avatar therapy may help to reduce auditory hallucinations for people with schizophrenia

An experimental therapy which involves a face-to-face discussion between a person with schizophrenia and an avatar representing their auditory hallucination may help reduce symptoms, when provided alongside usual treatment, according to a study.

Earth-air heat exchanger best way to protect farm animals in livestock buildings against the effects of climate change

Without countermeasures, climate change will negatively impact animals in pig and poultry production. Beside the health and wellbeing of the animals, heat stress also affects performance and, as a result, profitability. As the animals are predominantly kept in confined livestock buildings equipped with mechanical ventilation systems, researchers examined the inlet air temperature of several air co...

Flies could help to monitor disease outbreaks by acting as 'autonomous bionic drones' suggest scientists

Swarms of flies can be used to help monitor disease outbreaks, suggest scientists. This follows their research that shows how whole communities of bacteria – known as a microbiome – can “hitch a ride” on common carrion flies and can be transferred to any surface where the flies land. 

Thursday 23rd November 2017

Imaging technique shows progress Alzheimer's disease

Using ‘Raman’ optical technology, scientists can now produce images of brain tissue that is affected by Alzheimer’s disease. The images include the surrounding areas, already showing changes.

Hormone therapy in the menopause transition does not increase risk of stroke

Postmenopausal hormone therapy is not associated with increased risk of stroke, provided that it is started early, according to a new report.

Neurobiology: The chemistry of memory

Learning requires the chemical adaptation of individual synapses. Researchers have now revealed the impact of an RNA-binding protein that is intimately involved in this process on learning and memory formation and learning processes.

Highly charged molecules behave paradoxically

Chemistry researchers have now discovered how certain small biomolecules attach to one another. The researchers’ study also overturns the standard picture – particles with the same electrical charge appear to be drawn together and not vice versa. The results may be important for the development of new drugs.

Key to regenerating blood vessels discovered

A signaling pathway that is essential for angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, has been discovered by researchers. The findings may improve current strategies to improve blood flow in ischemic tissue, such as that found in atherosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease associated with diabetes.

China's reversing emission flows revealed by research

The flow of China's carbon emissions has reversed, according to new research. The study estimates the carbon implications of recent changes in the country's economic development patterns and role in international trade since the global financial crisis.

Wednesday 22nd November 2017

Glucocorticoids offer long-term benefits for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Glucocorticoids, a class of steroid hormone medications often prescribed to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, offer long-term benefits for this disease, including longer preservation of muscle strength and function and decreased risk of death.

One-size treatment for blood cancer probably doesn't fit all, researchers say

Though African-American men are three times more likely to be diagnosed with a blood cancer called multiple myeloma, most scientific research on the disease has been based on people of European descent. That trend is problematic considering that African-Americans -- the most at-risk population for multiple myeloma -- have different genetics that can affect how this type of cancer progresses and wh...

Prion protein found in skin of CJD patients

Scientists have detected abnormal prion protein in the skin of several people who died from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The scientists also exposed healthy mice to skin extracts from two CJD patients, and all developed prion disease. The study results raise questions about the possible transmissibility of prion diseases via medical procedures involving skin, and whether skin samples might be ...

Meningococcal vaccine could protect against 91 percent of targeted bacterial strains

Up to 91 percent of bacterial strains causing a common type of invasive serogroup B meningococcal disease in children and young adults are likely to be covered by a four-component vaccine called MenB-4C (Bexsero), according to laboratory studies.

Nanosponges show promise for potentially blinding eye infections

Using a mouse model that engineered nanosponges can be used to protect eyes from infections caused by Enterococcus faecalis, researchers demonstrate. Enterococcus faecalis contain a toxin called cytolysin, which is found in roughly 50 percent of isolates that cause post-operative intraocular infections seen in the United States.

Low-salt, heart-healthy dash diet as effective as drugs for some adults with high blood pressure

A study of more than 400 adults with prehypertension, or stage 1 high blood pressure, found that combining a low-salt diet with the heart-healthy DASH diet substantially lowers systolic blood pressure -- the top number in a blood pressure test -- especially in people with higher baseline systolic readings.

Surprising roles for muscle in tissue regeneration, study finds

Researchers have illuminated an important role for different subtypes of muscle cells in orchestrating the process of tissue regeneration. Notably, in the absence of these muscles, regeneration fails to proceed.

Study questions exclusion of cancer survivors from trials

A quarter of newly diagnosed cancer patients 65 or older are survivors who had a prior cancer – often preventing them from participating in clinical trials, researchers have found.

Genome of Leishmania reveals how this parasite adapts to environmental changes

Scientists demonstrate that Leishmania adaptation results from frequent and reversible chromosomal amplifications. This novel insight into Leishmania genomic instability should pave the way for the identification of parasite drug resistance mechanisms and help discover biomarkers.

New mechanisms found of cell death in neurodegenerative disorders

New mechanisms of cell death have now been discovered, which may be involved in debilitating neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, report scientists.

Plague likely a Stone Age arrival to central Europe

A research team has sequenced the first six European genomes of the plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis dating from the Late Neolithic to the Bronze Age (4,800 to 3,700 years ago). Analysis of these samples suggests that the Stone Age Plague entered Europe during the Neolithic with a large-scale migration of people from the Eurasian steppe.

Genetic factors linked to acquired narrowing of the airway

Endotracheal intubation and tracheotomy are widely used in the hospital setting for elective surgery and in cases of serious illness or critical injury. In rare instances the procedures result in the development of scarring and narrowing of the larynx and trachea, or acquired laryngotracheal stenosis (ALTS). Who is susceptible to ALTS -- and why -- is unclear, but according to new research, geneti...

Health service complaints system putting patients at risk, harming doctors' mental health

Current process for complaints against doctors reduces their wellbeing and causes fear-driven working practices that could compromise patient care, suggests a new English study.

High-intensity exercise boosts memory, new research suggests

The health advantages of high-intensity exercise are widely known but new research points to another major benefit: better memory. The findings could have implications for an aging population which is grappling with the growing problem of catastrophic diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer's.

Smart people have better connected brains

Differences in intelligence have so far mostly been attributed to differences in specific brain regions. However, are smart people's brains also wired differently to those of less intelligent persons? A new study supports this assumption. In intelligent persons, certain brain regions are more strongly involved in the flow of information between brain regions, while other brain regions are less eng...


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