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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Science Daily

05:53 EST 18th February 2018 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Science Daily" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

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Showing News Articles 1–25 of 3,100+ from Science Daily

Friday 16th February 2018

Increasing incidence of rare skin cancer

While it may not be as common as other skin cancers, Merkel cell carcinoma is highly aggressive and often deadly — and according to new research, it’s also becoming more common.

Shot may help shield against shingles

Two vaccines are available to help prevent shingles, which can affect anyone who has had chickenpox or the chickenpox vaccine; both diseases are caused by the same virus, which stays in the body after chickenpox clears.

Progress in pursuit of sickle cell cure

Bioengineers use gene editing to correct the mutation responsible for sickle cell disease in up to 40 percent of patients' cells used for lab testing.

Humans will actually react pretty well to news of alien life

Hollywood has it wrong. Humans would actually react positively to news of alien life -- intelligent or microbial.

Drug transfer tested using placenta-on-a-chip

Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of their 'organ-on-a-chip' platform in studying how drugs are transported across the human placental barrier.

No testosterone changes found in esports gamers

Players of the competitive esports video game League of Legends showed no change in testosterone during game play, researchers have found.

While a baby was still attached via the umbilical cord, doctors attached a pacemaker to the baby's heart

Researchers completed the first-ever EXIT (Ex Utero Intrapartum Treatment) to ventricular pacing procedure. The patient, a 36-week fetus with complete atrioventricular block and cardiac dysfunction, was at high risk of pre-term death. While attached to its mother via umbilical cord, the baby received a temporary pacemaker, which stabilized its dangerously low and irregular heart rate and ensured e...

Teens post online content to appear interesting, popular and attractive

Teens work very hard to create a favorable online image through careful selection of which photos, activities and links to post on Facebook and Instagram, according to a recent study. Content that makes them appear interesting, well-liked and attractive to their friends and peers is a primary goal for adolescents when deciding what to share in digital spaces.

Increased stress on fathers leads to brain development changes in offspring

New research in mice has found that a father's stress affects the brain development of his offspring. This stress changes the father's sperm, which can then alter the brain development of the child. This new research provides a much better understanding of the key role that fathers play in the brain development of offspring.

Restoring memory creation in older or damaged brains

Aging or impaired brains can once again form lasting memories if an enzyme that applies the brakes too hard on a key gene is lifted, according to neurobiologists.

Thursday 15th February 2018

Rapid pollution increases may be as harmful to the heart as absolute levels

Rapid increases in pollution may be as harmful to the heart as sustained high levels, according to new research. The authors urgently call for confirmatory studies as even residents of clean air cities could be at risk.

Mouse and human kidney development compared

Three new research articles compare human and mouse kidney development to identify shared and novel features. The studies revealed deep conservation of certain processes, but also significant differences in gene expression during kidney development, as well as in the timing, scale, organization, and molecular profile of key cell types and cell structures.

Why do healthy children die from the flu? Study offers new insights

With this year’s severe flu season, one statistic is especially chilling. Each year, around 50 percent of all children under 5 years old who die from the flu were previously healthy. Adults who die from the flu, on the other hand, typically had a medical condition that increased their risk of mortality. A new study offers new insights as to why healthy children are much more vulnerable. It also ...

How a carb-restricted diet battles fatty liver disease

New details about how a carbohydrate-restricted diet improves metabolism were revealed in a new study which could lead to improved treatments for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).  

Labs differ widely in BRCA testing protocols

A new article showcases the wide differences in BRCA testing protocols at labs around the world. The article surveyed 86 laboratories around the world about their BRCA testing practices and found that all the labs differed widely in their approach.

New guideline warns pain benefits of medical cannabis overstated

A new medical guideline suggests Canada's family physicians should take a sober second thought before prescribing medical cannabis to most patients.

Researchers challenge claims that sugar industry shifted blame to fat

In recent years, high-profile claims in the academic literature and popular press have alleged that the sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and emphasize instead the dangers of dietary fat. Historians challenge those claims through a careful examination of the evidence.

CRISPR-based diagnostic tool advanced, miniature paper test developed

The team that first unveiled the rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive CRISPR-based diagnostic tool called SHERLOCK has greatly enhanced the tool's power to work with a miniature paper test, similar to a pregnancy test, allowing rapid and simple detection in any setting. Additional features greatly expand both the breadth and sensitivity of the diagnostic information, including the ability to detec...

Specific set of nerve cells controls epileptic seizures' spread through brain

Experimental activation of a small set of nerve cells in the brain prevents convulsive seizures in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy, the most common form of epilepsy among human adults.

Chemists harness artificial intelligence to predict the future (of chemical reactions)

A team of researchers have developed state-of-the-art software to predict reaction yields while varying up to four components. Their software can work for any reaction on any substrate, using Spartan data. The researchers hope it will prove to be a valuable tool in expediting the synthesis of new medicines.

Loss of control eating and bariatric surgery success

Recent research examined the impact of eating behaviors on success rates related to bariatric surgery in adolescents.

How cancer cells repair themselves following proton beam therapy

New research identifies the specific cellular process that helps cancer cells damaged as a result of proton beam therapy, repair themselves.

Induced pluripotent stem cells could serve as cancer vaccine

Induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, are a keystone of regenerative medicine. Outside the body, they can be coaxed to become many different types of cells and tissues that can help repair damage due to trauma or disease. Now, a study in mice suggests another use for iPS cells: training the immune system to attack or even prevent tumors.

Existing drug effective at preventing onset of type 1 diabetes in 60% of patients

A drug commonly used to control high blood pressure may also help prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes in up to 60 percent of those at risk for the disease.

Study dispels notion social media displaces human contact

Echoing concerns that grew with the World Wide Web itself a decade earlier, the rise of social media has stoked fears of 'social displacement' -- the alienation of people from friends and family in favor of Facebook and Twitter. A new study goes a fair distance toward debunking that notion.


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