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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Science Daily

08:28 EDT 20th August 2018 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Science Daily" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

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Showing News Articles 1–25 of 2,600+ from Science Daily

Sunday 19th August 2018

Weaponizing oxygen to kill infections and disease

The life-threatening bacteria MRSA can cripple a medical facility since it is resistant to treatment. But scientists report that they are now making advances in a new technique that avoids antibiotics, instead using light to activate oxygen, which wipes out bacteria. The method also could be used to treat other microbial infections, and possibly even cancer.

Saturday 18th August 2018

Insight into development of lung cancer

Lung cancer results from effects of smoking along with multiple genetic components. A new study identifies two main pathways for the role of chromosome 15q25.1 -- a leader in increasing susceptibility to lung cancer -- in modifying disease risk. One pathway is implicated in nicotine dependence. The other plays a part in biological processes such as nutrient transfer and immune system function. The...

Chemistry professor develops contaminant detection technique for heparin

In 2008, a contaminant eluded the quality safeguards in the pharmaceutical industry and infiltrated a large portion of the supply of the popular blood thinner heparin, sickening hundreds and killing about 100 in the US.

Friday 17th August 2018

Like shark attacks and the lottery, unconscious bias influences cancer screening

Study shows that doctors with personal experience of cancer are more likely to act against established guidelines to recommend that low-risk women receive ovarian cancer screening.

New way to grow blood vessels developed

Formation of new blood vessels, a process also known as angiogenesis, is one of the major clinical challenges in wound healing and tissue implants. To address this issue, researchers have developed a clay-based platform to deliver therapeutic proteins to the body to assist with the formation of blood vessels.

Three factors could explain physician burnout in the US

In just three years, physician burnout increased from 45.5 percent to 54.4 percent, according to a new article. They offer three factors that they say contribute to this burnout.

Moderate carbohydrate intake may be best for health, study suggests

A new study has found that diets both low and high in carbohydrates were linked with an increase in mortality, while moderate consumers of carbohydrates had the lowest risk of mortality. The study also found that low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with proteins and fats from plant sources were associated with lower risk of mortality compared to those that replace carbohydrates with proteins...

Why some people with brain markers of Alzheimer's have no dementia

A new study has uncovered why some people that have brain markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) never develop the classic dementia that others do. The results showed that resilient individuals had a unique synaptic protein signature that set them apart from both demented AD patients and normal subjects with no AD pathology.

Thursday 16th August 2018

Researchers are developing vaccines for human parasites

Researchers outline their lessons learned while creating vaccine candidates for hookworm and schistosomiasis.

Men and women show surprising differences in seeing motion

Researchers have found an unexpected difference between men and women. On average, their studies show, men pick up on visual motion significantly faster than women do.

Autism linked to egg cells' difficulty creating large proteins

New work reveals that the genetic factors underlying fragile X syndrome, and potentially from other autism-related disorders, stem from defects in the cell's ability to create unusually large protein structures. They found that mutations in the gene Fmr1 create problems in the and the reproductive system. They can lead to the most-common form of inherited autism, fragile X syndrome, as well as to ...

That stinks! One American in 15 smells odors that aren't there

A new study finds that one in 15 Americans (or 6.5 percent) over the age of 40 experiences phantom odors. The study is the first in the US to use nationally representative data to examine the prevalence of and risk factors for phantom odor perception. The study could inform future research aiming to unlock the mysteries of phantom odors.

Chemists find a surprisingly simple reaction to make a family of bioactive molecules

Many natural products and drugs feature a so-called dicarbonyl motif -- in certain cases however their preparation poses a challange to organic chemists. In their most recent work, chemists present a new route for these molecules. They use oxidized sulfur compounds even though sulfur is not included in the final product.

Autoimmunity plays role in development of COPD

Autoimmunity plays a role in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study that analyzed human genome information.

YouTube is source of misinformation on plastic surgery

In the first study to evaluate YouTube videos on facial plastic surgery procedures, researchers found that most are misleading marketing campaigns posted by non-qualified medical professionals.

Expecting to learn: Language acquisition in toddlers improved by predictable situations

Two-year-old children were taught novel words in predictable and unpredictable situations. Children learned words significantly better in predictable situations.

The eyes may have it, an early sign of Parkinson's disease

The eyes may be a window to the brain for people with early Parkinson's disease. People with the disease gradually lose brain cells that produce dopamine, a substance that helps control movement. Now a new study has found that the thinning of the retina, the lining of nerve cells in the back of the eye, is linked to the loss of such brain cells.

Diagnosing cancer with malaria protein: New method discovered

Researchers have discovered a method of diagnosing a broad range of cancers at their early stages by utilizing a particular malaria protein, which sticks to cancer cells in blood samples. The researchers hope that this method can be used in cancer screenings in the near future.

Working memory might be more flexible than previously thought

Breaking with the long-held idea that working memory has fixed limits, a new study suggests that these limits adapt themselves to the task that one is performing.

Key protein involved in the development of autism discovered

The protein CPEB4, which coordinates the expression of hundreds of genes required for neuronal activity, is altered in the brains of individuals with autism, according to new research.

Trigger, target, trigger: Scientists explore controlled carbon monoxide release

Scientists have developed flavonoid-based, organic carbon monoxide-releasing molecules that exhibit CO release only when triggered by visible light. Using fluorescence microscopy, the researchers demonstrate targeted CO delivery by the photoCORMs to human lung cancer cells, as well as the ability of the molecules to produce anti-inflammatory effects.

Immune cell dysfunction linked to photosensitivity, study finds

Researchers have discovered that a type of immune cell known as Langerhans appears to play an important role in photosensitivity, an immune system reaction to sunlight that can trigger severe skin rashes.

Miscarriage cause, key cellular targets of potential drugs, revealed in new research

Researchers have discovered a gene mutation underlying hydrops fetalis -- a fatal condition to fetuses due to fluid buildup in the space between organs. The proteins at the center of this finding have already been implicated in a number of diseases, opening avenues of potential drug discovery related to migraines, diabetes, osteoporosis, and other conditions.

Highly effective natural plant-based food preservative discovered

Scientists have discovered a plant-based food preservative that is more effective than artificial preservatives.

Key mechanism of DNA replication discovered

Researchers have uncovered a key control mechanism of DNA replication with potential implications for better understanding how cells maintain genetic information to prevent diseases or cancer.


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