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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Discover Magazine

02:37 EDT 20th September 2018 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Discover Magazine" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

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Showing News Articles 1–25 of 227 from Discover Magazine

Wednesday 19th September 2018

Employees Trust Each Other More in Competitive Workplaces

Firms in competitive industries are often seen as cutthroat and intense places to work. But while the work might be intense, the employees tend to trust and cooperate with each other, according to a study published Wednesday in Science Advances. The high stakes appear to bring about group cohesiveness, which might have deep evolutionary roots. The Canadian and American researchers examined severa...

Tuesday 18th September 2018

Top 10 Secrets About Stress and Health

It’s no secret that stress is bad for your health. Everybody knows that “life stress events” — things like loss of a job, death of a loved one and getting divorced (or married) raise the risk of getting sick. All sorts of other life events also generate stress, with possible negative health effects ranging from catching a cold to major depression to a fatal heart attack. Of course, know...

Scientists Discover Major Cause Of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Researchers have identified a prime culprit behind inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD, an incurable disorder that causes abdominal pain, diarrhea and weight loss from malnutrition. The discovery also reveals a pathway to treatment, scientists report today in the journal Cell Reports. “We were able to block the inflammation, basically block IBD,” said Ze’ev Ranai, a biologist at Sanford Bur...

Monday 17th September 2018

Activity - Not Rest - Speeds Recovery After Brain Injury in Mice

Conventional wisdom advocates for rest after suffering an injury. Now researchers have discovered that activity — not rest — helps the brain recover from trauma in mice. The finding suggests that challenging the brain early after damage can speed up healing. “Lengthy rest periods are supposed to be key to the brain’s healthy recovery, but our study in mice demonstrates that re-engaging th...

What Is CBD Oil and Why Do People Take It?

One of the most controversial drugs in America can’t even get you high. Derived from marijuana, CBD, or cannabidiol, could help treat a range of medical conditions, early research suggests — but its Schedule I status has made it hard to study, leaving researchers and patients in the dark. Although it’s usually found as an oil, CBD can be infused into snacks and drinks, or come in transderma...

What Is CBD and Why Do People Take It?

One of the most controversial drugs in America can’t even get you high. Derived from marijuana, CBD, or cannabidiol, could help treat a range of medical conditions, early research suggests — but its Schedule I status has made it hard to study, leaving researchers and patients in the dark. Although it’s usually found as an oil, CBD can be infused into snacks and drinks, or come in transderma...

Thursday 13th September 2018

In the Face of High Costs, DIYers Hope to Brew Their Own Insulin

Soon after Federick Banting discovered that insulin could be used to treat diabetes in 1921, he sold the patent to the University of Toronto for about a dollar. Banting received the Nobel prize because his discovery meant a life-saving drug could become widely available. Nearly a century later, an American with diabetes can pay as much as US$400 per month for insulin, driving some uninsured patien...

BPA Replacements Harm Reproductive Health in Mice

Twenty years ago, Patricia Hunt, a reproductive biologist at Washington State University in Pullman, revealed bisphenol A, a chemical in plastic, caused reproductive problems in mice. Soon “BPA” became a household term and “BPA-free” water bottles and consumer packaging cropped up everywhere. Now Hunt and her same team of scientists are back with a new study that shows the compounds that...

How Your Brain Lies with Confirmation Bias

The power of our fleshy brain to control our perceptions is well established, but it’s still hard to really believe, sometimes. It’s tempting to think of ourselves as perfect observers, passively gathering data and information. But however real reality may seem, it’s just whatever our brains our feeding us. We all have various biases that, unknown to us, color how we see and interpret infor...

Wednesday 12th September 2018

How Satellites Are Peering Into Public Health Issues

Scientists say they have a new way of measuring obesity — from space. Can those jokes — it doesn't have anything to do with individuals. Instead, researchers from the University of Washington took satellite maps of various U.S. cities and trained an AI to look for features of the neighborhoods that might be relevant to health. This included things like green spaces, housing density, gyms, fas...

A Simple Blood Test Could Tell You the Time Inside Your Body

In life, timing is everything. Your body’s internal clock – the circadian rhythm – regulates an enormous variety of processes: when you sleep and wake, when you’re hungry, when you’re most productive. Given its palpable effect on so much of our lives, it’s not surprising that it has an enormous impact on our health as well. Researchers have linked circadian health to the risk of diabe...

Tuesday 11th September 2018

Men Are Attracted to the Scents of Fertile Women

Body odor gets a bad rap, but a person’s fragrance doesn’t have to reek like teenage boys after sports practice. Some bodily smells are pleasant. And new research suggests they might appeal to more than our noses. Straight men find the smell of women’s reproductive hormones attractive, scientists report today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The discovery suggests women...

Fertile Women Smell Amazing to Men

Body odor gets a bad rap, but a person’s fragrance doesn’t have to reek like teenage boys after sports practice. Some bodily smells are pleasant. And new research suggests they might appeal to more than our noses. Straight men find the smell of women’s reproductive hormones attractive, scientists report today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The discovery suggests women...

Gene Mutation Made Our Ancestors Better Long Distance Runners

Humans aren’t as strong as lions, can’t run as fast as cheetahs and don’t see as well as owls. But there is one thing we are pretty good at: endurance running. Between 2 and 3 million years ago, our African ancestors adapted to a climate period that caused forests to thin and arid savannahs to expand. Changes to their biology and skeletal structure enabled them to run longer distances, offe...

How the Bilingual Brain Switches Languages

It seems researchers are a little closer to knowing how the bilingual brain works. A new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences highlights how our minds shift from speaking in one language to another. Past work had already narrowed in on a couple of brain regions related to cognitive control — the prefrontal cortex at the front of the brain and the anterior cingulate cor...

Monday 10th September 2018

Technology Aims to Bring Us Longer Lives. How Ethical is That?

Life extension – using science to slow or halt human aging so that people live far longer than they do naturally – may one day be possible. Big business is taking this possibility seriously. In 2013 Google founded a company called Calico to develop life extension methods, and Silicon Valley billionaires Jeff Bezos and Peter Thiel have invested in Unity Biotechnology, which has a market cap...

Vegetarian Diets Use Half As Much Water

The world’s freshwater is in short supply thanks in part to a ballooning global population that uses thousands of liters of water everyday to produce foodstuffs from oil and vegetables to meat, dairy and alcohol. Now researchers have discovered new evidence that a healthy diet, like those followed by pescatarians and vegetarians, also uses significantly less water. “It is a win-win situation,...

Friday 7th September 2018

Probiotics Probably Don’t Help As Much As You Think They Do

Plenty of people sing the praises of probiotics. These cultures of live bacteria can come in an array of products, from foods like yogurts to dietary supplements and even skin creams. Generally, these products tend to claim they’ll boost health by tweaking your microbiome, the collection of bacteria and other microorganisms that live in and on your body. And sometimes, doctors even encourage peo...

Wednesday 5th September 2018

Drugs Team Up to Counter Antibiotic Resistance

As the crisis of antibiotic resistance deepens, researchers are looking for new ways to combat infectious diseases. One solution proposed by UCLA researchers: When one drug won't work, try two. Or three, four or five. Seeing What Sticks In a new paper in Nature Systems Biology and Applications, scientists take a look at eight common antibiotics and run through thousands of combinations involving a...

Tuesday 4th September 2018

What Crouching Cockroaches Tell Us About Why We Sleep

If you watch an exhausted baby carefully, you may be able to see gravity tug heavy eyelids down. Likewise, a sleeping honeybee’s usually perky antennae droop (as illustrated here, the top row shows various views of a honeybee awake, the bottom row shows the insect at rest). This adorable sign of insect repose may seem unremarkable. But studying insect slumber may ultimately help solve some of s...

Thursday 30th August 2018

Syphilis Infections Of The Eye Are On The Rise in Brazil

Brazil has seen a recent uptick in cases of syphilis affecting the eyes, an infection that can lead to serious vision loss if not treated quickly enough. While ocular syphilis is a rarely-seen form of the sexually transmitted infection, one study put rates at around 2 percent of syphilis patients, it can cause serious problems for those infected, including loss of vision, cataracts and glaucoma....

Wednesday 29th August 2018

Synthetic Marijuana is Far More Dangerous Than Weed

A version of this article originally appeared on The Conversation. The Green, a gathering place in New Haven, Connecticut, near Yale University looked like a mass casualty zone, with 70 serious drug overdoses over a period spanning Aug. 15-16, 2018. The cause: synthetic cannabinoids, also known as K2, Spice, or AK47, which induced retching, vomiting, loss of consciousness and trouble breathing. ...

Friday 24th August 2018

Quitting Smoking Makes You Gain Weight. It's Still Healthier

Give up smoking for cheesecake? Maybe that’s not such a bad idea. People who quit smoking cigarettes often gain weight. That’s not necessarily because ex-smokers need a new habit and they enjoy eating. It’s because the nicotine in cigarettes suppresses appetite to some degree. When the nicotine stops, appetite returns and people can put on pounds. The correlation between quitting smoking a...

Tuesday 21st August 2018

Strange Drug Overdoses Are Mystifying Hospitals

An explosion of strange new narcotics is hitting the streets, as clandestine chemists rush to produce drugs that exist outside the law. One United Nations report tallied 644 new drugs discovered across 102 countries and territories between 2008 and 2015. And in an interview last year, a Drug Enforcement Administration spokesperson said they encounter previously unheard of drugs on an almost week...

Monday 20th August 2018

How Human Smarts Evolved

Suzana Herculano-Houzel spent most of 2003 perfecting a macabre recipe—a formula for brain soup. Sometimes she froze the jiggly tissue in liquid nitrogen, and then she liquefied it in a blender. Other times she soaked it in formaldehyde and then mashed it in detergent, yielding a smooth, pink slurry. Herculano-Houzel had completed her Ph.D. in neuroscience several years earlier, and in 2002, sh...


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