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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Australian Life Scientist

06:58 EDT 26th September 2018 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Australian Life Scientist" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

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Showing News Articles 1–25 of 461 from Australian Life Scientist

Tuesday 25th September 2018

More than half the world to miss chronic disease targets

More than half of all countries are predicted to fail to reach the UN target to reduce premature deaths from cancers, cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes by 2030. That’s according to new analysis published in The Lancet ahead of the third UN High-Level Meeting on NCDs (non-communicable diseases), commencing on 27 September. The study authors say that countries must ...

Spraying Systems Co Klarion cleaning system

Using electrochemical activation (ECA) technology, the Klarion system produces powerful cleaning and sanitising solutions that are said to be safer than traditional chemicals. By combining only salt, water and electricity, the system can output sodium hydroxide cleaner and hypochlorous acid sanitiser, which is produced on demand, in ready-to-use concentrations. The solutions produced are designed...

Metabolite measurement device inspired by Star Trek

Researchers from the University of Glasgow have announced an exciting new development in their ‘multicorder’ project, which seeks to make rapid, sophisticated medical diagnostics more accessible to people around the world. Inspired by Star Trek’s famous tricorder, used by medics within the program to make quick and accurate diagnoses, the researchers’ new device pairs a handheld sensor wi...

Monday 24th September 2018

Nanomedicine to treat prostate cancer in man's best friend

A 10-year-old beagle with prostate cancer is helping researchers at The University of Queensland (UQ) use nanomedicines to accurately diagnose and target the disease. Nanomedicine is the science of developing tiny particles for applications in health — in this case, therapeutics to specifically target a protein found in prostate cancer. According to Associate Professor Kris Thurecht, the new te...

Deep-learning algorithm controls paralysed arms

US researchers have developed a deep-learning algorithm that can analyse the brain activity of patients with tetraplegia — paralysis of the arms and legs. Described in the journal Nature Medicine, the algorithm has been employed to deliver electrical stimulation to the patient’s forearm muscles, thereby restoring functional movements to the previously paralysed limb. The brain-computer interf...

Sunday 23rd September 2018

Questions raised about swine flu vaccine

Internal safety reports from 2009 — unearthed as part of a lawsuit — suggest that GSK and public health officials were aware of a variety of serious adverse events logged in relation to Pandemrix, according to The BMJ’s Associate Editor Peter Doshi. But it would seem neither GSK nor health authorities made the information public, neither during the H1N1 outbreak nor in the eight years sinc...

Thursday 20th September 2018

DNA detection of crown-of-thorns starfish to improve monitoring

Researchers at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) have made a significant breakthrough in the war against crown-of-thorns starfish, developing a cost-effective method for detecting the DNA of the coral-eating pest. According to AIMS senior research leader Dr Sven Uthicke, the method — published in the journal Coral Reefs — will improve monitoring and early detection of the reef...

Scientists assemble the cane toad genome

As explained by project leader Prof Peter White, from UNSW, “There are major gaps in our understanding of cane toad genetics, and up until now no-one had put the genome together.” A decade ago, Western Australian researchers tried to sequence the cane toad genome, but they encountered obstacles and didn’t complete the project. For this project, the researchers worked at the Ramaciotti Centr...

Wednesday 19th September 2018

Dytran Model 3168D2 single-axis IEPE accelerometer

Dytran Instruments has introduced the Model 3168D2 single-axis IEPE quartz accelerometer for health and usage monitoring systems (HUMS) and flight test applications. Featuring a thru-hole design for 360° cable orientation, the sensor has mechanical and electrical filters that effectively eliminate ultrahigh-frequency energy that can cause signal saturation (common in high-speed gearbox applicati...

Tuesday 18th September 2018

Schedule released for Sydney medical cannabis conference

CannaTech Sydney, believed to be Australia’s first ever medical cannabis summit, will take place from 28–30 October 2018 at Doltone House, Darling Island Wharf, overlooking the Sydney Harbour Bridge and city skyline. An initiative of iCAN: Israel-Cannabis, CannaTech has a global focus that offers senior industry leaders, medical and scientific experts, and new ventures the platform to come to...

Scheduled released for Sydney medical cannabis conference

CannaTech Sydney, believed to be Australia’s first ever medical cannabis summit, will take place from 28–30 October 2018 at Doltone House, Darling Island Wharf, overlooking the Sydney Harbour Bridge and city skyline. An initiative of iCAN: Israel-Cannabis, CannaTech has a global focus that offers senior industry leaders, medical and scientific experts, and new ventures the platform to come to...

Monday 17th September 2018

Identifying gut microbes linked to mammalian evolution

North American scientists have made a key advance towards understanding which of the trillions of gut microbes may play important roles in how humans and other mammals evolve, coming up with a way of classifying these microbes based on their ancestry and common distribution across mammals. Their work has been published in the journal mBio. As explained by lead author Christopher Gaulke, a postdoc...

Feedback invited on Women in STEM 10-year plan

The Australian Academy of Science is calling for the nation’s views on the barriers and enablers that affect participation, retention and success of women and girls in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). The academy has prepared a discussion paper to briefly describe the key issues and areas that will be considered in the development of the plan and to provide the questions for b...

Thermo Scientific VetDrugs Explorer Collection

Food scientists can now take advantage of a start-to-finish solution that offers robust and sensitive analysis of multiresidue veterinary drugs in complex animal-derived sample matrices, helping identify animal and dairy products that may be unsafe for human consumption. The Thermo Scientific VetDrugs Explorer Collection is a single-provider, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrome...

Sunday 16th September 2018

Protein found to help limit inflammation

Researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ) have discovered a previously unknown role for the cholesterol regulatory protein LRP1, showing that it also manages the body’s inflammation response. Led by Dr Lin Luo and Professor Jennifer Stow, from UQ’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience, the discovery will help us understand how poorly controlled inflammation exacerbates diseases includi...

Immune cells associated with schizophrenia

No single cause of schizophrenia has ever been identified, and this has prevented the development of a cure. Current treatments for schizophrenia are designed to suppress symptoms rather than target underlying causes of the disorder, and can produce unwanted side effects. According to NeuRA’s Professor Cynthia Shannon Weickert, most scientists have a long-held belief that immune cells are indep...

Thursday 13th September 2018

World-leading astronomer wins Matthew Flinders Medal

An Honorary Fellow with CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Dr Manchester is a world-leading authority on pulsars — small spinning neutron stars that send out regular pulses of radio emission, left behind after a normal star has died in an explosion. During his career he has led teams that have discovered more than 1700 pulsars — about 60% of all pulsars now known. These discoveries have been ...

Molecular details of key migraine initiator revealed

Migraines affect approximately two million Australians and are characterised by symptoms including pain, nausea and poor sleep. They account for nearly 3% of all time lost to disability. Now, Melbourne researchers have revealed the molecular details of the key initiators in migraine headaches. In a paper published in Nature, researchers from the Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (MIPS

Wednesday 12th September 2018

Autonomous breast cancer detection program evokes Tetris

Researchers from the University of Adelaide’s Australian Institute for Machine Learning (AIML) have developed a fully automated medical image analysis program to detect breast tumours — and its method may seem a little familiar. In conjunction with an MRI scan, the AI-based autonomous program employs the traversal movement and style of a retro video game to examine the breast area. It was dev...

Breakthroughs in antibiotics old and new

Researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ) have been involved in an international trial tweaking the use of existing antibiotics — a trial they believe could eventually save 30,000 lives annually. UQ’s Professor David Paterson served as corresponding author on the study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). He said there is “an urgent need t...

Tuesday 11th September 2018

State-of-the-art 'Tech Lab' opens at UTS

The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) has formally opened its latest state-of-the-art research facility, known as Tech Lab — a purpose-built, $65 million facility that is spread across 9000 m2 on a site in the industrial hub of Botany, neighbouring Sydney Airport. Tech Lab will focus on transdisciplinary research that provides new services to industry, with capabilities that span, but are n...

Medlab granted a licence to export cannabis

Australian medical life sciences company Medlab Clinical has received a licence to export cannabis from the Office of Drug Control (ODC) in Canberra, as it relates to the company’s two cannabis-based medicines — NanaBis and NanaBidial. NanaBis is a whole plant 1:1 extract of CBD and THC, while NanaBidial is a whole plant extract of CBD and THC (predominantly CBD). Both products utilise Medlab...

Monday 10th September 2018

Flu-based vaccine can protect against tuberculosis

Researchers at Sydney’s Centenary Institute have come one step closer to developing a more effective vaccine against the world’s deadliest infectious disease, demonstrating how an Influenza A-based vaccine can be used to activate immune cells in the lungs — and help protect against tuberculosis in the process. As the world’s single most deadly infectious disease, tuberculosis is a serious...

New $5m microscope installed at University of Queensland

The University of Queensland has installed a new $5 million Hitachi HF5000 200 kV Transmission Electron Microscope that can see objects smaller than the very smallest atom — a hydrogen atom. Advanced health tools, battery technology and nanomaterials are all potential developments that could flow from the microscope at the newly renovated Hawken Microscopy Facility at UQ’s Centre for Microsco...

Sunday 9th September 2018

'Educated killer cells' show promise in pancreatic cancer

Researchers from the UK, US and Australia have demonstrated the success of a new, cell-based immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer. Published in the journal Gut, the team’s treatment led to mice being completely free of cancer — including cancer cells that had already spread to the liver and lungs. Pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at a late and advanced stage, when the tumour has already sp...


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