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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Australian Life Scientist

17:52 EDT 21st June 2018 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Australian Life Scientist" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

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Showing News Articles 1–25 of 433 from Australian Life Scientist

Wednesday 20th June 2018

Report: Synthetic biology could be misused to create weapons

Synthetic biology expands the possibilities for creating new weapons — including making existing bacteria and viruses more harmful — while decreasing the time required to engineer such organisms. That’s according to a new report from The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (US), which claims that although some malicious applications of synthetic biology may not seem pl...

Australian Antarctic Science Council to be established

The federal government is creating an Australian Antarctic Science Council to revitalise science research, as well as boost Hobart’s position as an Antarctic science hub and as the premier gateway to Antarctica. The Antarctic Science Council is set to provide further strategic direction for the Australian Antarctic Program, oversee science funding priorities and ensure funds directly support An...

Over 2700 stem cell scientists in Melbourne this week

More than 2700 stem cell scientists from 50 countries are in Melbourne this week for the 16th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). The ISSCR Annual Meeting is the world’s largest meeting focused on stem cell research. Presentations span the breadth of the field, including topics such as cell-based disease modelling; gene editing and gene therapy; neural, c...

Tuesday 19th June 2018

Gene transfer rules written in DNA

A team led by a New Zealand researcher has discovered that bacteria’s ability to transfer genes, like those associated with antibiotic resistance, is governed by a previously unknown set of rules that are written in the DNA of the recipient. Dr Heather Hendrickson, of Massey’s Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, made the discovery along with a team of scientists from the Univers...

Could a computer program treat triple negative breast cancer?

A computer program developed by Monash University researchers has revealed a previously unknown combination of drugs that may be the answer to treating triple negative breast cancer, using genetic and treatment data from cancer cells grown in labs and from hundreds of patients worldwide. The work has been published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology. Triple negative breast cancer is aggres...

Tracking pancreatic cancer's moving targets

For the first time, they have monitored these drug-resistant regions in pancreatic tumours as they travel, spread and grow in real time — and are finding new ways to neutralise these moving targets. The results of their work have been published in the journal Cell Reports. Regions of low oxygen, which move around within tumours, are a hallmark of pancreatic tumours. These travelling pockets of ...

Monday 18th June 2018

Major stem cell conference in Melbourne this week

More than 2500 stem cell scientists from 50 countries will descend on Melbourne for the 16th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). To be held from 20–23 June at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre, the event will feature over 150 speakers presenting on a variety of topics, including: Making brain cells from skin cells to understand a new brain ...

Could platypus venom help treat diabetes?

A key metabolic hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), found in the venom and gut of the Australian platypus, will now be investigated for its potential to treat type 2 diabetes. The study is being conducted by the University of Adelaide, Flinders University, Monash University, SAHMRI and the Royal Adelaide Hospital, with funding from Medvet Science. The researchers are investigating whether...

Sunday 17th June 2018

Research opens new pathways for vaccine development

Burnet Institute researchers have identified a novel process used by the immune system to kill and clear malaria. The research, led by PhD student Liriye Kurtovic and supervised by Burnet’s Head of Malaria Research, Professor James Beeson, establishes that antibodies produced by the immune system interact with important proteins in the blood called complement to block the ability of malaria to ...

LiveCyte: Every cell tells a story

The Challenges of Live Cell Imaging The biggest challenge for many live cell researchers is to characterise individual cells without impacting their behaviour through the act of monitoring them. Whilst the use of fluorescent labels allows both cells and cellular functions to be visualised, the levels of illumination needed to excite the fluorophores can alter innate properties of cells, with the ...

Thursday 14th June 2018

The brain's genetic secrets can be found in the blood

It turns out our blood can be used to uncover genetic secrets inside the brain, with researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ) recently using blood samples to identify gene targets for brain-related traits like IQ and diseases such as schizophrenia. The work was led by Professor Jian Yang and Dr Ting Qi, the former of whom said this discovery will open up new avenues of research and impr...

CSIRO announces Earth observation centre

CSIRO has announced the establishment of its new Centre for Earth Observation, focused on collecting and analysing data about Earth from space. The centre will help Australian researchers maximise the benefits of observing Earth from space and further develop Australia’s space sector, which is estimated to be worth over $3 billion per year. It will coordinate a range of Earth-observing activiti...

Wednesday 13th June 2018

Acquifer imaging machine for high-content screening

The Acquifer imaging machine is a fully automated microscopy system for small model organisms and cell-based screening applications. It is an easy-to-use, high-speed screening platform that is especially suitable for time-lapse recording and focused on high stability, easy maintenance, maximum experiment reproducibility and long-term data transparency. Typical applications include screening of zeb...

Blood filter therapy for kidney patients wins innovation award

A new haemodialysis therapy that has the potential to significantly advance renal care for patients in New Zealand has won the James & Wells Medical Technology Association of New Zealand (MTANZ) Innovation Award for 2018. Baxter Healthcare received the award for its HDx enabled by Theranova haemodialysis (HD) therapy from Jonathan Lucas, partner at James & Wells, at the Health Tech Week. ...

New blood test could predict heart attack

Australian researchers have developed a blood test that improves the prediction of long-term risk of heart attack or death in those with severe coronary artery disease. The Austin Health and University of Melbourne researchers found patients with coronary artery disease who had a high level of an enzyme called ACE2 were more likely to die or suffer from a heart attack over the next 10 years. The...

Advanced manufacturing partnership targets bacterial biofilms

Novel solutions for biofilm infections are the focus of a four-year, $3.5 million collaborative research agreement between the University of Sydney, medical and industry manufacturer Whiteley Corporation and the Innovative Manufacturing Cooperative Research Centre (IMCRC). The research will be led by Dr Jim Manos and Dr Theerthankar Das from the University of Sydney, along with Dr Trevor Glasbey ...

Tackling antibiotic resistance, one piece of possum poo at a time

As explained by Dr Koa Webster, Project Coordinator on the ‘Scoop a Poop’ project, evidence of antibiotic resistance has been found in gut and faecal bacteria from numerous wildlife species in both terrestrial and marine environments — so it’s not just an issue that affects humans. “Resistance doesn’t exist in isolation in human-associated bacteria, but rather there are connections be...

Tuesday 12th June 2018

Metrohm OMNIS Sample Robot fully automated TAN/TBN titration

Metrohm presents a fully automated solution for the determination of total acid number (TAN) and total base number (TBN) in up to 112 samples. The process is based on the OMNIS Sample Robot and addresses the needs of QC laboratories in the petrochemical industry as well as contract laboratories looking for an efficient solution to cope with high sample loads. On the OMNIS Sample Robot, the entire...

Melbourne scientists reveal key cancer-fighting gene's secret weapons

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute scientists have discovered how the key cancer-preventing gene p53 stops the development of blood cancers. The findings revealed that a special group of genes that function within the body’s normal DNA repair process were vital to the effectiveness of p53. This new information could help doctors to better identify patients with an increased risk of developing cert...

Crowdsourcing security intelligence

In a memorable scene in the 2012 thriller Zero Dark Thirty, the CIA Director asks his inner circle for views about the chance that Osama Bin Laden was in a particular compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. “100 per cent he’s there. OK fine, 95 per cent, because I know certainty freaks you guys out, but it’s 100,” says the film’s hero, intelligence agent Maya. She’s right of course, but in...

Monday 11th June 2018

Drug-carrying nanoparticles designed to treat brain cancer

Described in the journal Nature Communications, the particles are designed so that they can easily cross the blood-brain barrier and bind directly to tumour cells, where they deliver two different drugs. The nanoparticles used in the study are based on particles originally designed by Paula Hammond and Stephen Morton, both of whom are authors on the new paper. These spherical droplets, known as l...

Nüvü Camēras EM N2 1024 back-illuminated EMCCD camera

The EM N2 1024 back-illuminated EMCCD camera by Nüvü Camēras is a fully customisable EMCCD camera for optimal performance and offers a high signal-to-noise ratio for photon counting in low-light imaging applications. Fields of application include fluorescence and bioluminescence, spectroscopy, super resolution, OEM and astronomy. The camera supports three standard EMCCD detector sizes (128 x 1...

Pharmaceutical material could be used in grid-scale batteries

US scientists have developed a highly reversible, water-soluble material based on phenazine, an organic molecule used in dyes and antibiotics. The compound could potentially serve as an alternative to vanadium, which is used in grid-scale batteries to store electricity. Supported by the Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) dev...

Thursday 7th June 2018

Real-time tool to help treat drug-resistant tuberculosis

Australian researchers have designed a computer-generated model that will allow clinicians to tailor effective therapies for individual patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB), reducing drug resistance globally as a result. According to the World Health Organization, TB is the leading cause of death globally from a single infectious agent. Mycobacterium tuberculosis typically affec...

Monash scientists get US patent for malaria diagnostic technique

A research collaboration headed by a Monash chemist has received a US patent for a diagnostic technique that could deliver a more accurate test for malaria. The patent is said to be the first of its kind to use spectroscopy to quantify pathogens in blood. The patent results from work undertaken by a team headed by Associate Professor Bayden Wood, the Director the Monash Centre for Biospectroscop...


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