Advertisement

Topics

Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Meridian Institute

19:08 EDT 20th June 2018 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Meridian Institute" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

More Information about Meridian Institute on BioPortfolio

In addition to our news stories we have dozens of PubMed Articles about Meridian Institute for you to read. Along with our medical data and news we also list Meridian Institute Clinical Trials, which are updated daily. BioPortfolio also has a large database of Meridian Institute Companies for you to search.

Showing News Articles 1–25 of 364 from Meridian Institute

Monday 2nd October 2017

FS-AgBiotech News to End

Meridian Institute’s Food Security and AgBiotech News (FS-AgBiotech News), which has been running continuously for 17 years, will cease publication effective today. FS-AgBiotech started in 2000 with generous support from The Rockefeller Foundation and, in recent years, it enjoyed steady funding from the US Agency for International Development (USAID). That funding ran out on September 30. Despit...

Thursday 28th September 2017

FAO Regional Meeting on Agricultural Biotechnologies in Sub-Saharan Africa

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Regional Meeting on Agricultural Biotechnologies in Sustainable Food Systems and Nutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa will take place at the African Union Conference Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on November 22-24, 2017. According to the meeting announcement, “The meeting will be hosted and co-organized by the Government of Ethiopia. I...

Special Report: Drowning in Grain - How Big Ag Sowed Seeds of a Profit-Slashing Glut

The world is awash in grain - a global glut of corn, wheat and soybeans is now in its fourth year, and the world’s ending stocks of total grains are poised to reach a record 638 million tons. “The bin-busting harvests of cheap corn, wheat and soybeans are undermining the business models of the world’s largest agriculture firms and the farmers who use their products and services,” this arti...

Industry Calls on the Commission to 'Show Leadership' in Plant Breeding Innovation

The European Commission, amid criticism that it has delayed the creation of a framework for biotechnology in the European Union, is this week holding a conference on modern biotechnologies in agriculture. The aim of the conference is to open the discussion about innovation-driven solutions in the field. “Generally speaking, the Commission considers that a broad EU reflection on new breeding tech...

Wednesday 27th September 2017

Heat-Tolerant Broccoli for the Future

Researchers at the United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service have developed and characterized genetic sources of heat tolerance in broccoli. "We identified genetic markers associated with resistance to heat damage in these plants," said Mark Farnham, a plant geneticist. "An important finding of this work is that the resistance trait is a complex trait controlled by many...

Technology Is Helping Middle-Class Nigerians Turn to Farming without Getting Their Hands Dirty

Despite numerous calls for Nigeria to diversity its oil-dependent economy, oil remains the country’s biggest export. Many Nigerian administrations have pushed middle-class Nigerians to take up farming as part of the diversification effort, but it has been mostly talk and little action. But now technology is helping new agro-tech startups to find success. Startups like FarmCrowdy and ThriveAgric ...

Scientists Decode the Genome of Fall Armyworm: A Moth Pest That Is Invading Africa

An international consortium of researchers, including those from the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), has sequenced one of the first genomes of the moth from the fall armyworm - a crop pest that has become invasive in Africa since 2016. The fall armyworm is known to attack over 100 plant species; in Africa, it has destroyed maize crops in 21 countries in the south and we...

Tuesday 26th September 2017

Climate Insurance Is Rarely Well Thought Out in Agriculture

Researchers at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Germany, and the University of Oregon, United States, in a recent review article in the journal Global Environmental Change, say that while internationally subsidized agricultural insurance is intended to protect farmers in developing countries from the effects of climate change, it can have undesirable ecological and social sid...

Study Identifies Likely Scenarios for Global Spread of Devastating Crop Disease

A team of scientists from the University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom Met Office and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT) has used adapted modeling systems to predict when and how wheat stem rust is most likely to spread around the world. Wheat rust, especially aggressive new strains such as “Ug99,” first detected in Uganda in 1999, causes global economic losses of...

New Study Reveals Agrobiodiversity Investments as Triple Win for Health, Environment and Food System Sustainability

Bioversity International, an agrobiodiversity research center, has released a new guide, “Mainstreaming Agrobiodiversity in Sustainable Food Systems,” showing that investments in agrobiodiversity play a critical, yet overlooked, role in tackling such global issues as poverty, malnutrition, environmental degradation, and climate change. “Agrobiodiversity – the edible plant a...

Monday 25th September 2017

Green Algae Could Hold Clues for Engineering Faster-Growing Crops

New research from Princeton University, United States, has resulted in insights into how green algae siphon carbon dioxide from the air for use in photosynthesis, which is a key factor in their ability to grow quickly. Understanding the process, the researchers say, could help improve growth rates in crops such as wheat and rice. “Understanding how algae can concentrate carbon dioxide is a key s...

French Government Declares War on Pesticides

France said this week that it plans to cut back use of all pesticides, although it stepped back from an earlier announcement that it would impose an outright ban of the controversial chemical glyphosate. Christophe Castaner, a government spokesman, had said earlier on Monday that the country would phase glyphosate out by 2022 amid fears that it may cause cancer. He later reversed these comments, s...

GM Corn Found in over 90% of Tortillas in Mexico

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University of México found that slightly over 90 percent of the tortillas sold in Mexico contain traces of genetically modified (GM) corn. Elena Álvarez-Buylla Roces, one of the researchers, called the results “striking” because “cultivation of genetically modified corn in open fields is not allowed in Mexico,” due to ongoing legal action and ...

A Battle to Save the World's Favorite Treat: Chocolate

Cacao production once brought prosperity to the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica, but a fungus - Moniliophthora roreri, or frosty pod rot - led the industry to topple in the 1970s and 1980s. By 1983, Costa Rican exports had declined by 96 percent and the industry has never recovered. Part of the problem was that just a few cacao varieties are widely cultivated, despite the diversity and availability ...

Wednesday 20th September 2017

AfDB, Brazil to Groom African Youth in Cassava Processing

The African Development Bank (AfDB) and the Brazil-Africa Institute (BAI) have launched an initiative, the Youth Technical Training Program (YTTP), which aims to train young African professionals in research and technology transfer. The focus areas of the initiative include agriculture and rural development, health, education, information and communication, infrastructure, and the creative industr...

Improving Agribusiness Competitiveness in African Nations Can Boost Food Security and Agricultural Productivity

In a new analysis of African agribusiness competitiveness, Dr. Suresh Babu, the head of capacity strengthening at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), says, “African countries have a very high potential to transform their agricultural sector by increasing the competitiveness of their agribusiness. Competitiveness in agribusiness has a feedback effect that helps in sustainin...

IFAD President: 'We Shouldn't Shy Away from Engaging the Private Sector'

The United Nations should move forward with engaging the private sector, said Gilbert Houngbo, the president of the UN’s International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). Earlier this week, IFAD and the global candy company Mars Inc. signed a memorandum of understanding to work together to improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers by ensuring better access to training, technology and ...

Tuesday 19th September 2017

Crowning the "King of the Crops": Sequencing the White Guinea Yam Genome

An international team of researchers has identified the regions in the genome of yams that determines sex in yams. Yams are one of the few flowering plants that have separate males and females, a trait called dioecy. Knowledge of this rare feature is vital for improving yam cultivars. Despite the fact that the tubers are a staple part of the diet in many parts of the world, the crop is relatively ...

RNA Discovery Could Help Boost Plant Heat, Drought Tolerance

Researchers at Texas A&M University, United States, have discovered a ribonucleic acid (RNA) that can increase the thale cress plant’s resistance to both drought and salt stress. "This is the first finding of a long non-coding RNA, or lncRNA, that regulates plant tolerance to adverse, non-physiological external factors," said Dr. Limiung Xiong, an associate professor. The discovery, he added, co...

A Cereal Survives Heat and Drought

An international consortium has sequenced the genome of pearl millet, a staple food plant in the arid and semi-arid regions of Africa, India and Asia. Pearl millet is known for its high resistance to drought stress, but the molecular mechanisms behind this resistance have been rather unknown. The research team was able to sequence the genome of pearl millet along with an additional 994 breeding li...

Connecting Plants and Society: The Shenzhen Declaration, a New Roadmap for Plant Sciences

This article reports on the Shenzhen Declaration for Plant Sciences, which came out of the XIX International Botanical Congress held in July 2017 in China. At the closing session of the Congress, nearly 7,000 plant scientists from 77 countries endorsed a declaration to focus their research and educational efforts on finding solutions to the growing challenges of our changing world. Central to the ...

Monday 18th September 2017

GMO Cassava Could Help Nigerian Farmers Prolong Crop Storage

Nigeria’s National Biosafety Management Agency (NBMA) is currently reviewing an application from the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA) to conduct confined field trials for a cassava variety genetically engineered to prolong root storage. Scientists at the IITA said the field trial poses no threat to the nation. The information gained from the trial, they say, will give cass...

Portable DNA Sequencers Help African Farmers Fight Crop Disease

Scientists at the University of Western Australia (UWA) are helping farmers in East Africa use new portable DNA sequencing technology to fight diseases that affect cassava crops. The device, called the MinION, was developed by the United Kingdom-based company Oxford Nanopore. It is being used by the researchers to get real-time data on what strain of virus is destroying the cassava crops of farmer...

World Hunger Again on the Rise, Driven by Conflict and Climate Change, New UN Report Says

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), global hunger is again on the rise, following a steady decline over the last decade. The FAO report on world food security and nutrition, released last week, found that 11 percent of the global population, or 815 million - an increase of 38 million people over the prior year - suffer from hunger. At the same time, mult...

How Big Business Got Brazil Hooked on Junk Food

This article, in The New York Times, investigates the way Western food companies - which have seen their growth slow in wealthy nations - are aggressively expanding in developing countries, leading to obesity and health problems. There is, the article says, a broad transformation of the food system occurring, one that is “delivering Western-style processed food and sugary drinks to the most isol...


Advertisement
Quick Search
Advertisement
Advertisement

 

News Quicklinks