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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Cancer Research UK

04:27 EST 25th November 2017 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Cancer Research UK" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

More Information about Cancer Research UK on BioPortfolio

In addition to our news stories we have dozens of PubMed Articles about Cancer Research UK for you to read. Along with our medical data and news we also list Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials, which are updated daily. BioPortfolio also has a large database of Cancer Research UK Companies for you to search.

Showing News Articles 1–25 of 279 from Cancer Research UK

Friday 24th November 2017

Our milestones: Nudging breast cancer radiotherapy in the right direction

Science blog This entry is part 29 of 29 in the series Our milestones In this instalment, we take look at how the START trials provided crucial evidence to change practice for women having radiotherapy for early stage breast cancer. The journey from discovering x-rays to using them to treat cancer was a quick one. It began in the winter of 1895 in a physicist’s lab in central Bavaria, Germany...

Gut bacteria might hitch a ride with spreading bowel cancer cells

News report Bacteria found in certain bowel cancers can also be found inside a small number of tumours that have spread to another part of the body, says new research. The bacteria helped bowel cancer cells grow in mice. Researchers said this adds to the evidence of a relationship between growing bowel cancers and the types of microorganisms in the gut.  The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute team a...

Thursday 23rd November 2017

Experimental drug trial seeks to improve treatment for head and neck cancer

Press release A trial to test an experimental drug in patients with head and neck cancer launches* in the UK today (Friday), through the Combinations Alliance** – a joint initiative between Cancer Research UK and the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) Network. “We hope that combining this drug with chemotherapy will mean that treatment is more effective helping more people survive...

Tuesday 21st November 2017

Bowel screening and car park cancer scans: what you need to know about the latest NHS announcements

Science blog It’s a simple message: diagnose cancer earlier and treatment is more likely to be successful. But doing this isn’t so simple. That’s why a string of announcements from NHS England chief, Simon Stevens, have made headlines today. Stevens is launching a number of new ways that he says will help the NHS in England diagnose cancers earlier and improve cancer services. And they ra...

Bowel screening and car park cancer scans: what you need to know about today’s NHS announcements

Science blog It’s a simple message: diagnose cancer earlier and treatment is more likely to be successful. But doing this isn’t so simple. That’s why a string of announcements from NHS chief, Simon Stevens, have made headlines today. Stevens is launching a number of new ways that he says will help the NHS in England diagnose cancers earlier and improve cancer services. And they range from...

Saturday 18th November 2017

News digest – breast cancer drugs, alcohol pricing, ‘indulgent grandparents’, and… coffee (again)?

Science blog Two new breast cancer drugs have been given the green light for use on the NHS in England for certain patients. We reported that the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) approved palbociclib (Ibrance) and ribociclib (Kisqali) after an undisclosed discount was agreed with the makers of the drugs. The drugs can slow the growth of certain advanced breast cancers f...

Thursday 16th November 2017

Two breast cancer drugs get NHS approval

News report Two breast cancer drugs have been recommended for use by the NHS in England.  In draft guidance, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has approved palbociclib (Ibrance) and ribociclib (Kisqali) for patients with advanced breast cancer.  “These drugs have allowed women to live a normal life for longer." - Professor Nicholas Turner, The Institute of Cance...

Wednesday 15th November 2017

'Vaping should be part of support' to help smokers with mental health conditions quit

News report A group of health bodies and charities has called for more to be done to help smokers with mental health conditions quit, including accessing e-cigarettes and other treatments.  In its Statement on Electronic Cigarettes, the Mental Health & Smoking Partnership said that smoking remains “part of the culture in too many mental health settings”, and that vaping and nicotine re...

Minimum alcohol pricing in Scotland gets go ahead

News report The UK Supreme Court has dismissed a challenge against new legislation that allows Scotland to enforce minimum pricing on alcohol.  The judges rejected an appeal from the Scotch Whisky Association (SWA), standing by the plan which aims to improve public health.  “It’s a shame expensive legal action has delayed this welcome measure. We now expect the Scottish Government to pres...

Tuesday 14th November 2017

Building a career in brain tumour research: Dr Noor Gammoh

Research Feature Noor holds a CRUK Career Development Fellowship. She completed her postdoc at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre in New York, before moving to the UK in June 2014 to further her cutting-edge work in understanding brain tumours at the University of Edinburgh. She’s extremely positive about the move, and the doors it has opened for her research career. “When considering c...

Science Surgery: ‘Is the one-size-fits-all treatment approach obsolete?’

Science blog This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Science Surgery Our Science Surgery series answers your cancer science questions. If you have a question that you’d like us to answer, send it to us using the email address at the bottom of this post. Toyin asked: “Do you think personalised therapy will soon be the norm in the management of cancer? Do you think that the standard practice ...

Monday 13th November 2017

‘My Alcohol Tracker’: could Amazon’s Alexa help you cut down on your drinking?

Science blog It can tell you the time, read you the news and even crack a joke or two, but could Amazon’s Alexa play a role in your health too? Alexa is one of a growing number of voice technologies that are slowly becoming part of people’s everyday lives. Most smartphones have some form of voice assistant, and ‘hands-free’ speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home Mini have beco...

Cancer Research UK develops alcohol tracker for Amazon Alexa

Press release Cancer Research UK has created an Amazon Alexa Skill to allow users to track their alcohol consumption and help raise awareness of the link between alcohol and cancer. The My Alcohol Tracker* Skill has been launched to mark alcohol awareness week from Monday 13th November. "My Alcohol Tracker uses voice recognition technology to help people get a better idea of what they are drink...

Saturday 11th November 2017

News digest – Testosterone, artificial intelligence, genetic tests, the HPV vaccine and… a cuppa?

Science blog Our top story: women who have had the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine could need just 3 cervical screens in their lifetime to get the same benefits as the current 12 offered to women in the UK. The BBC, Times,

Friday 10th November 2017

NHS data shows drop in cervical cancer screening attendance

News report Less than three quarters of eligible women are attending cervical cancer screening appointments in England, according to new figures. As of March 2017, 72% of eligible women were screened within the recommended timeframe, compared to 75.7% in 2011.  Sophia Lowes, Cancer Research UK’s health information officer, said the figures were disappointing.  “Cervical screening aims pi...

Thursday 9th November 2017

HPV jab means women only need three cervical screens in a lifetime

Press release Women may only need three cervical screens in their lifetime if they have been given the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, according to a new study* published in the International Journal of Cancer. "The change in the screening system is a unique opportunity to reassess how often women are invited for cervical screens during their lifetimes.” - Professor Peter Sasieni, Cancer...

The HPV vaccine and cervical screening: how many tests do you need?

New research shows women who have had the HPV vaccine may only need 3 cervical screens in their entire life, rather than the 12 that are standard in the UK.

Wednesday 8th November 2017

Risk of certain breast cancers coming back remains for at least 20 years after treatment

News report The risk of a certain type of breast cancer coming back in other parts of the body stays constant for at least 20 years after treatment, according to a large study. The research, carried out by The Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ Collaborative Group, collected data from more than 60,000 women who had been diagnosed with hormone sensitive breast cancer (usually called oestrogen rece...

NCRI 2017: How knowing tumours inside and out is boosting progress

Science blog If you’ve noticed that the media has been abuzz with the word cancer recently, that’s not by coincidence. Scientists have been revealing their latest findings in a string of conferences all across the globe, from Lisbon’s Advanced Breast Cancer Fourth International Consensus to the International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Philadelphia. Over the...

Monday 6th November 2017

Big data analysis predicts risk of radiotherapy side effects

Press release Analysing big data to predict men’s risk of side effects could help personalise radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer, according to new research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute’s (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool. “We hope that our method can be used to personalise radiotherapy for patients based on this risk, improving the chances of a cure an...

Celebrating a lifetime in cancer prevention, translating evolutionary biology, and our leaders of tomorrow: the 2017 CRUK Research Prizes

Research Feature   Our annual Research Prizes recognise the achievements of the rising stars in cancer research, and celebrate the researchers who have shown outstanding dedication to beating cancer. We're back at the NCRI Conference in Liverpool to award our prizes for the eighth year. Our leaders of tomorrow: the Future Leaders Prize The Future Leaders in Cancer Research Prize recognises res...

Sunday 5th November 2017

Test could diagnose oesophageal cancer 8 years earlier

Press release A new genetic test could help diagnose oesophageal cancer up to 8 years before symptoms appear in people at a high risk of the disease, according to new research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute’s (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool. University of Cambridge researchers  Sarah Killcoyne and Eleanor Gregson looked at tissue samples from people with Barrett...

Scientists exploit leaks in blood brain barrier to treat glioblastoma

Press release An ovarian cancer drug can leak through the blood brain barrier to reach brain tumours and could be an effective treatment for glioblastoma, suggest results presented at the National Cancer Research Institute’s (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool, today (Monday). "By showing that this drug reaches brain tumours, we are in a much stronger position to use it to

Saturday 4th November 2017

News digest – gut bacteria, aspirin, bowel cancer in women and… ‘wonky willy’ cancer risk?

Science blog Bacteria in cancer patients’ bowels may influence how well immunotherapy drugs work, according to two studies we, the BBC and STAT News covered. The studies also linked specific types of bacteria, as well as the overall diversit

Friday 3rd November 2017

Low testosterone levels linked to reduced risk of prostate cancer

Press release Men with unusually low amounts of testosterone in their blood are around 20% less likely to develop prostate cancer, according to new research* presented at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool. “In future, these results could be important in helping to devise an approach to reducing men’s risk of developing the disease.” - Professor ...


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