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Latest Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News from Scientific American

03:42 EDT 17th July 2018 | BioPortfolio

Here are the most relevant search results for "Scientific American" found in our extensive news archives from over 250 global news sources.

More Information about Scientific American on BioPortfolio

In addition to our news stories we have dozens of PubMed Articles about Scientific American for you to read. Along with our medical data and news we also list Scientific American Clinical Trials, which are updated daily. BioPortfolio also has a large database of Scientific American Companies for you to search.

Showing News Articles 1–25 of 645 from Scientific American

Monday 16th July 2018

Potential DNA Damage from CRISPR "Seriously Underestimated," Study Finds

A flurry of recent findings highlight a contentious question in this area  -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Light Beam Lets the Deaf (Gerbil) Hear

A next-generation cochlear implant might allow the hearing-impaired to listen to music and cope with noise -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Sunday 15th July 2018

Smaller Plates Don't Make Meals Look Bigger When You're Hungry

The Delboeuf illusion won’t help you trick yourself into eating smaller portions when you feel hungry -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Saturday 14th July 2018

Do Microwaves Cause Cancer?

Let’s take a look at 4 microwave myths that science has proven false -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Friday 13th July 2018

Could Brain Stimulation Slow Cancer?

Activating the reward system boosts anti-tumor immunity in mice -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

The Psychology of Roller Coasters

Perhaps the draw of roller coasters is the enjoyment of the visceral sensation of fear itself, much like watching a horror movie -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Thursday 12th July 2018

Smart Mouth Guard Senses Muscle Fatigue

A prototype flexible electronic mouth guard can measure lactate levels in an athlete’s saliva, tracking muscle fatigue during training and performance. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Smart Mouthguard Senses Muscle Fatigue

A prototype flexible electronic mouthguard can measure lactate levels in an athlete’s saliva, tracking muscle fatigue during training and performance. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

What Is Green Exercise?

Being outdoors can lower our levels of stress, our pulse rate, and even our blood pressure. But what happens when we exercise in a green space? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Why It's So Hard to Junk Bad Decisions--Edging Closer to Understanding "Sunk Cost"

Humans, rats and mice all exhibit the decision-making phenomenon, but new research suggests not all choices are equally vulnerable to it -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

CRISPR Makes Cancer Cells Turncoats That Attack Their Tumor

The experimental approach showed promise across three types of malignancies in mice -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Diversity and Inclusion in Medical Schools: The Reality

More students are coming from marginalized groups, but when they arrive they’re often told to hide what makes them different -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Wednesday 11th July 2018

The Art of Lying

Lying has gotten a bad rap. In fact, it is among the most sophisticated accomplishments of the human mind. But how can one tell if a person is fibbing? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

If High Court Reverses Roe v. Wade, 22 States Poised to Ban Abortion

Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy had been a swing vote on the issue -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Tuesday 10th July 2018

Early Life Experience: It's in Your DNA

Surprising study suggests experiences while young causes brain to experience changes to the genome -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Rescued Thai Boys Being Watched for Illnesses Caught from Cave Animals

Medical responders will be on the lookout for signs of infection -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Monday 9th July 2018

Brains of Children with Autism Show Unusual Folding Patterns

The brains of children with autism fold differently than those of their typical peers. Whether they are unusually smooth or convoluted depends on location and age -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

What Your Facebook Network Reveals about How You Use Your Brain

If your friends mostly know each other only indirectly, through you, you're likely to be a better problem solver and to be more successful overall -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Sunday 8th July 2018

Yes, Make Psychedelics Legally Available, but Don't Forget the Risks

Psychedelics have psychological and spiritual benefits, as a new best seller claims, but they’re far from a panacea -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Saturday 7th July 2018

Does Sparkling Water Make You Hungry?

Carbonated drinks may increase the "hunger hormone" ghrelin, but these hormones are only one of many factors that contribute to our subjective experience of being hungry -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Friday 6th July 2018

Use of "Smart Drugs" on the Rise

European nations see biggest increases in use of stimulants such as Ritalin by people seeking brain-boosting effects -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Thursday 5th July 2018

Primate Conflicts Play Out in the Operating Room

By analyzing 200 surgeries, anthropologists found that mixed-gender operating room teams exhibited the highest levels of cooperation. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Are We All a Little Paranoid?

Kafka’s novel, The Trial, is often described as a descent into the ravings of a paranoid mind. Yet could there be a little paranoia in us all? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Wednesday 4th July 2018

How to Help a Loved One Suffering from Mental Illness

As a family member, encouraging a loved one to seek mental health treatment is one of the thinnest tightropes we can walk -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Monday 2nd July 2018

People Ration Where They Roam

An analysis of the movement of some 40,000 people suggests most of us frequent only 25 places—and as we sub in new favorites, we drop old ones. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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