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Greater Understanding of Plant Hormone Results in Stem Cells that Grow Shoots

09:01 EDT 5 Jul 2017 | Meridian Institute

Researchers at Dartmouth College, United States, have identified how a plant hormone, cytokinin, targets genes to regulate plant growth and development. Cytokinin, the team found, activates the transcription factor ARR10 to control gene expression in the model plant Arabidopsis. "The question has always been how cytokinin regulates so many different processes within a plant," said Eric Schaller, a professor of biological sciences. "Now we know the genes that are the primary targets of cytokinin, and we can provide the toolbox for manipulating the plant hormone response." The findings, the authors said, could allow scientists to establish organ-growing stem cells for grains like rice and corn. "What we have done is activate the plant to make a stem cell center for a shoot to form," added Schaller. "By finding the direct targets of what is impacted by cytokinin, we can fine-tune our focus in the future." The research, he said, sets the stage for further work that could help improve yields for important agricultural products. The team’s work was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Original Article: Greater Understanding of Plant Hormone Results in Stem Cells that Grow Shoots

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