Advertisement

Topics

Watch the moon's shadow slide across the U.S. from space

14:19 EDT 21 Aug 2017 | Yahoo News

Watch the moon's shadow slide across the U.S. from spaceThanks to the millions who witnessed and photographed the total solar eclipse on Monday, we're quite familiar with what the event looked like from the ground.  But what did it look like from space? Thankfully, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is testing out its latest weather satellite, known as GOES-16, which launched in November of 2016. The agency put the satellite to use tracking the eclipse. SEE ALSO: Neil deGrasse Tyson on all things Great American Eclipse The agency released a series of images and animations on Monday featuring the moon's shadow as it creeped across the lower 48 states. This first image, taken by the satellite's Advanced Baseline Imager, picked up the moon's shadow coming ashore in the Pacific Northwest.  Satellite image from GOES-16, showing the moon's shadow across the Northwest U.S.Image: NOAA.The NOAA, which operates weather satellites, forecasts severe weather, and protects marine species, among other duties, also released an image later in the day showing the shadow of the eclipse located across the East Coast.  The imager that took this photo can take a snapshot of Earth every 15 minutes.  Satellite image from GOES-16, showing the moon's shadow across the East.Image: noaa.Astronauts on the International Space Station also had a unique vantage point for the eclipse, which they shared via social media.  Millions of people saw #Eclipse2017 but only six people saw the umbra, or the moon's shadow, over the United States from space today. pic.twitter.com/hMgMC5MgRh — Intl. Space Station (@Space_Station) August 21, 2017 Voila! The #Eclipse2017 shadow from @Space_Station, no words needed // Voilà! L'eclisse vista dalla Stazione Spaziale, non servono parole... pic.twitter.com/7kD5AYb5zj — Paolo Nespoli (@astro_paolo) August 21, 2017 You probably saw #SolarEclipse2017 from Earth...but what did it look like from space? Check out these @Space_Station views: pic.twitter.com/6uPdyRFbXs — NASA (@NASA) August 21, 2017 NASA and NOAA will likely have newer, and even better platforms in the sky when the next total solar eclipse appears above the U.S. in 2024.


Original Article: Watch the moon's shadow slide across the U.S. from space

NEXT ARTICLE

More From BioPortfolio on "Watch the moon's shadow slide across the U.S. from space"

Advertisement
Quick Search
Advertisement
Advertisement