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Study in mice finds dietary levels of genistein may adversely affect female fertility

19:00 EST 13 Nov 2017 | AAAS

(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A new study of mice by scientists at the University of Illinois raises concerns about the potential impact that long-term exposure to genistein prior to conception may have on fertility and pregnancy. The study was conducted by food science and human nutrition professor William G. Helferich, comparative biosciences professor Jodi A. Flaws, Illinois alumna Shreya Patel and animal sciences research specialist James A. Hartman.

Original Article: Study in mice finds dietary levels of genistein may adversely affect female fertility

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