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Scientists Identify "Elusive" Human Pancreatic Progenitor Cells

05:45 EST 28 Feb 2018 | Genetic Engineering News

Scientists at the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI), University of Miami, have identified and characterized a population of progenitor cells located in defined areas of the human pancreas, which can be stimulated to develop into glucose-responsive beta cells. The researchers, co-led by Juan Dominguez-Bendala, Ph.D., DRI director of pancreatic stem cell development for translational research, and Ricardo Pastori, Ph.D., director of molecular biology, claim that their discovery could feasibly allow the development of cell-based therapies for type 1 and type 2 diabetes that are derived from the patients’ own stem cells. "Our in-depth study of these pancreatic stem cells may help us tap into an endogenous cell supply 'bank' for beta-cell regeneration purposes and, in the future, lead to therapeutic applications for people living with type 1 diabetes," said and co-principal investigator of the team’s research, which is published in Cell Reports (“ P2RY1/ALK3-Expressing Cells within the Adult Human ...

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