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Domestication of food plants frequently involves loss of toxin production

19:47 EDT 14 Jun 2019 | GMO pundit


How to make almonds palatable
The domesticated almond tree has been feeding humans for millennia. Derivation from the wild, bitter, and toxic almond required loss of the cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin. Sánchez-Pérez et al. sequenced the almond genome and analyzed the genomic region responsible for this shift. The key change turned out to be a point mutation in a transcription factor that regulates production of P450 monooxygenases in the biosynthetic pathway for the toxic compound.


Mutation of a bHLH transcription factor allowed almond domestication
R. Sánchez-Pérez and colleagues
Science 14 Jun 2019:
Vol. 364, Issue 6445, pp. 1095-1098
DOI: 10.1126/science.aav8197

Original Article: Domestication of food plants frequently involves loss of toxin production

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