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Newly Discovered Functional Mosaicism May Explain Disease Relapse and Antibiotic Resistance

09:00 EDT 11 Sep 2019 | Genetic Engineering News

University of Maryland scientists’ studies in the nematode C. elegans found that seemingly identical cells can use different protein molecules to carry out the same process. Their research suggests that in some cases antibody resistance or cancer relapse may occur when some cells in a population survive drug therapy by activating alternative molecules or genes to those targeted by treatment.

The post Newly Discovered Functional Mosaicism May Explain Disease Relapse and Antibiotic Resistance appeared first on GEN - Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News.

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