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Scientists were able to extract genetic information from a 1.77 million-year-old rhino tooth, according to a Nature paper. The set of proteins in the enamel of a now-extinct rhino is 1 million years older than the oldest DNA sequenced, taken from a horse.

19:38 EDT 12 Sep 2019 | Nature Publishing

Scientists were able to extract genetic information from a 1.77 million-year-old rhino tooth, according to a Nature paper. The set of proteins in the enamel of a now-extinct rhino is 1 million years older than the oldest DNA sequenced, taken from a horse. https://go.nature.com/2lQxfKY 

Original Article: Scientists were able to extract genetic information from a 1.77 million-year-old rhino tooth, according to a Nature paper. The set of proteins in the enamel of a now-extinct rhino is 1 million years older than the oldest DNA sequenced, taken from a horse.

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Bioinformatics is the application of computer software and hardware to the management of biological data to create useful information. Computers are used to gather, store, analyze and integrate biological and genetic information which can then be applied...