Topics

Adrenaline Doesn't Actually Cause the Fight-or-Flight Response, New Study Says

17:49 EDT 12 Sep 2019 | Discover Magazine

When you're overcome with fear, it's not adrenaline making you want to fight or flee. (Credit: Master1305/Shutterstock) A thrilling high when you’re faced with danger, a boost of energy when you’re going for an intense run – we tend to associate these rushes with adrenaline, a hormone synonymous with our fight-or-flight response. But it turns out adrenaline might not be what activates our brains' stress reaction after all. In fact, our bones might be doing more work than we originally th

Original Article: Adrenaline Doesn't Actually Cause the Fight-or-Flight Response, New Study Says

NEXT ARTICLE

More From BioPortfolio on "Adrenaline Doesn't Actually Cause the Fight-or-Flight Response, New Study Says"

Quick Search

Relevant Topics

Endocrinology
Diabetes Diabetes Endocrine Disorders Obesity Oxycontin Renal Disease Thyroid Disorders Endocrinology is the study of the endocrine glands and the hormones that they secrete (Oxford Medical Dictionary). There are several g...

Stress
Stress is caused by your perception of situations around you and then the reaction of your body to them. The automatic stress response to unexpected events is known as 'fight or flight'. Discovered by Walter Cannon in 1932, it is the release of h...

Orthopedics
Arthroplasty Joint Disorders Orthopedics Spinal Cord Disorders Orthopedics is the science or practice of correcting deformities caused by disease or damage to the bones and joints of the skeleton. This specialized branch of surgery may ...