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Targeting certain rogue T cells prevents and reverses multiple sclerosis in mice

06:56 EDT 4 Oct 2019 | Science Daily

Multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disorder, is known to be driven by 'helper' T cells, white blood cells that mount an inflammatory attack on the brain and spinal cord. A new study pinpoints the specific subgroup of helper T cells that cause MS, as well as a protein on their surface, called CXCR6, that marks them. An antibody targeting CXCR6 both prevented and reversed MS in a mouse model, the researchers report.

Original Article: Targeting certain rogue T cells prevents and reverses multiple sclerosis in mice

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