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Nitrogen-fixing genes could help grow more food using fewer resources

19:00 EST 14 Jan 2020 | AAAS

(Washington State University) Scientists have transferred a collection of genes into plant-colonizing bacteria that let them draw nitrogen from the air and turn it into ammonia, a natural fertilizer. The work could help farmers around the world use less man-made fertilizers to grow important food crops like wheat, corn, and soybeans.

Original Article: Nitrogen-fixing genes could help grow more food using fewer resources

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