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Syngene Image Analyser Used at One of World’s Top Universities - To Help Determine the Molecular Mechanisms of Sight

12:27 EDT 10 Aug 2010 | BioPortfolio

May 18th 2010 Cambridge, UK: Syngene, a world-leading manufacturer of image analysis solutions, today announced its G:BOX iChemi XR imaging system is being used by scientists at the University of Cambridge to help unravel the molecular basis of sight.

Researchers in the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience (PDN), at the University of Cambridge are using a G:BOX iChemi XR system to accurately analyse chemiluminescent Western blots labelled with ECL PlusTM and also to image agarose gels containing DNA stained with SYBR Safe™. The information from the gels and blots is being used to understand the molecular mechanisms of phototransduction and retinal degeneration in fruit fly (Drosophila).


The G:BOX iChemi XR system in the Department of PDN contains intelligent control software to allow the system, once set up, to be left unattended to automatically produce a perfect chemiluminescent blot image. The system is also fitted with an orange filter and blue lighting for precise detection of SYBR GOLD, SYBR Green stains and SYBR Safe.

Dr Che-Hsiung Liu, a Research Associate in the Department of PDN stated: “By analysing mutant versions of genes involved in calcium and lipid signalling pathways we are beginning to understand the mechanisms of activation and regulation of the light-sensitive channels in the eye. The amounts of proteins that are up and down-regulated are often small and generate very weak chemiluminescent signal, therefore we have to have an imaging system that can detect these subtle changes. Additionally, we stain our DNA with SYBR Safe so that we can extract the DNA from the bands and we need an imager to detect these stains too. We reviewed four different types of imaging system and finally decided to install the G:BOX iChemi XR because it gave us the value of essentially having two systems in one.”

Laura Sullivan, Syngene’s Divisional Manager concluded: “We are delighted to see our G:BOX iChemi XR contributing to such interesting research. The fact that scientists at one of the world’s leading universities have compared so many image analysers and still believe our G:BOX iChemi XR outperforms them all, is a great testament to the unparalleled benefits this system offers both protein chemists and molecular biologists.”


-Ends-

For Further Information Contact:
Jayne Arthur, Syngene, Beacon House, Nuffield Road, Cambridge, CB4 1TF, UK.
Tel: +44(0) 1223-727123 Fax +44 (0) 1223-727101
Email: jayne.arthur@syngene.com Web site: www.syngene.com

Dr Che-Hsiung Liu, Research Associate, Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EG, UK.
Tel: +44 (0)1223 333899 Fax: +44 (0)1223 333840
Email:ch139@cam.ac.uk Web site: www.pdn.cam.ac.uk

Editor Contact:
Dr Sue Pearson, Director, International Science Writer, PO Box 170, Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 3GD, UK.
Tel/Fax: +44(0) 1462-635327 Email: sue6.pearson@ntlworld.com

Note to Editors

About Syngene

Syngene is a world-leading supplier of integrated imaging solutions for analysis and documentation of gel-based information. Syngene’s systems are used by more than 10,000 research organisations and over 50,000 individual scientists world-wide and include many of the world’s top pharmaceutical companies and major research institutes.

Syngene, founded in 1997 is a division of the Cambridge based Synoptics Group. The Group’s other divisions, Syncroscopy and Synbiosis, specialise in digital imaging solutions for microscopy and microbial applications respectively. Synoptics currently employs over 40 people in its UK and subsidiary operation in Frederick, USA.

About the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience

On January 1, 2006 the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, (PDN), was formed from the merger of the Departments of Anatomy and Physiology at the University of Cambridge. PDN is the largest department in the School of Biological Sciences at the University and research here is primarily in three major areas: Cellular and Systems Physiology, Developmental and Reproductive Biology, and Neuroscience.

The Department has strong collaborative links with the other departments in School of Biological Sciences and with the Clinical School, the Cambridge Centre for Brain Repair, the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, and the Gurdon Institute.

For Further Information Contact: Jayne Arthur, Syngene, Beacon House, Nuffield Road, Cambridge, CB4 1TF, UK. Tel: +44(0) 1223-727123 Fax +44 (0) 1223-727101 Email: jayne.arthur@syngene.com Web site: www.syngene.com NEXT ARTICLE

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