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Cenestin (synthetic conjugated estrogens, A) Tablets | Cenestin

04:40 EDT 27th August 2014 | BioPortfolio

Note: While we endeavour to keep our records up-to-date one should not rely on these details being accurate without first consulting a professional. Click here to read our full medical disclaimer.

Rx only

Revised SEPTEMBER 2004

11000422506

Close clinical surveillance of all women taking estrogens is important. Adequate diagnostic measures, including endometrial sampling when indicated, should be undertaken to rule out malignancy in all cases of undiagnosed persistent or recurring abnormal vaginal bleeding. There is no evidence that the use of “natural” estrogens results in a different endometrial risk profile than synthetic estrogens at equivalent estrogen doses. (See WARNINGS, Malignant neoplasms, Endometrial cancer .)

CARDIOVASCULAR AND OTHER RISKS

Estrogens with and without progestins should not be used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. (See WARNINGS, Cardiovascular disorders .)

The Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) study reported increased risks of myocardial infarction, stroke, invasive breast cancer, pulmonary emboli, and deep vein thrombosis in postmenopausal women (50 to 79 years of age) during 5 years of treatment with oral conjugated equine estrogens (CE 0.625 mg) combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA 2.5 mg) relative to placebo. (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Clinical Studies .)

The Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS), a substudy of WHI, reported increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age or older during 4 years of treatment with oral conjugated estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate relative to placebo. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women. (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Clinical Studies .)

Other doses of oral conjugated estrogens with medroxyprogesterone acetate, and other combinations and dosage forms of estrogens and progestins were not studied in the WHI clinical trials and, in the absence of comparable data, these risks should be assumed to be similar. Because of these risks, estrogens with or without progestins should be prescribed at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman.

Synthetic conjugated estrogens, A tablets contain a blend of nine (9) synthetic estrogenic substances. The estrogenic substances are sodium estrone sulfate, sodium equilin sulfate, sodium 17α-dihydroequilin sulfate, sodium 17α-estradiol sulfate, sodium 17β-dihydroequilin sulfate, sodium 17α-dihydroequilenin sulfate, sodium 17β-dihydroequilenin sulfate, sodium equilenin sulfate and sodium 17β-estradiol sulfate.

The structural formulae for these estrogens are:

Tablets for oral administration, are available in 0.3 mg, 0.45 mg, 0.625 mg, 0.9 mg and 1.25 mg strengths of synthetic conjugated estrogens, A. Tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: ethylcellulose, hypromellose, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycol, polysorbate 80, pregelatinized starch, titanium dioxide, and triethyl citrate.

-0.3 mg tablets also contain FD&C Blue No. 2 aluminum lake and D&C Yellow No. 10 aluminum lake.

-0.45 mg tablets also contain FD&C Yellow No. 6/Sunset Yellow FCF lake.

-0.625 mg tablets also contain FD&C Red No. 40 aluminum lake.

-0.9 mg tablets do not contain additional color additives.

-1.25 mg tablets also contain FD&C Blue No. 2 aluminum lake.

IMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-01.jpgIMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-02.jpgIMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-03.jpgIMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-04.jpgIMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-05.jpgIMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-06.jpgIMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-07.jpgIMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-08.jpgIMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-09.jpg

Endogenous estrogens are largely responsible for the development and maintenance of the female reproductive system and secondary sexual characteristics. Although circulating estrogens exist in a dynamic equilibrium of metabolic interconversions, estradiol is the principal intracellular human estrogen and is substantially more potent than its metabolites, estrone and estriol at the receptor level.

The primary source of estrogen in normally cycling adult women is the ovarian follicle, which secretes 70 to 500 mcg of estradiol daily, depending on the phase of the menstrual cycle. After menopause, most endogenous estrogen is produced by conversion of androstenedione, secreted by the adrenal cortex, to estrone by peripheral tissues. Thus, estrone and the sulfate-conjugated form, estrone sulfate, are the most abundant circulating estrogens in postmenopausal women.

Estrogens act through binding to nuclear receptors in estrogen-responsive tissues. To date, two estrogen receptors have been identified. These vary in proportion from tissue to tissue.

Circulating estrogens modulate the pituitary secretion of the gonadotropins, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) through a negative feedback mechanism. Estrogens act to reduce the elevated levels of these hormones seen in postmenopausal women.

Synthetic conjugated estrogens, A are soluble in water and are well absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract after release from the drug formulation. The Cenestin tablet releases the synthetic conjugated estrogens, A slowly over a period of several hours. The effect of food on the bioavailability of synthetic conjugated estrogens, A from Cenestin has not been studied.

IMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-10.jpg
Table 1 PHARMACOKINETIC  PARAMETERS FOR UNCONJUGATED AND CONJUGATED ESTROGENS IN HEALTHY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN UNDER FASTING CONDITIONS
Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Unconjugated Estrogens Following a Dose of 2 x 0.625 mg Cenestin
Drug Cmax (pg/mL) CV% Tmax (h) CV% AUC0-72h (pg•hr/mL) CV%
Baseline-corrected estrone 84.5 (41.7) 8.25 (35.6) 1749 (43.8)
Equilin 45.6 (47.3) 7.78 (28.8) 723 (67.9)
Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Conjugated Estrogens Following a Dose of 2 x 0.625 mg Cenestin
Drug Cmax (pg/mL) CV% Tmax (h) CV% t ½ (h) CV% AUC0-72h (pg•hr/mL) CV%
Baseline-corrected estrone 4.43 (40.4) 7.7 (30.3) 10.6 (25.4) 69.89 (39.2)
Equilin 3.27 (43.5) 5.8 (31.1) 9.7 (23.0) 46.46 (47.5)

The distribution of exogenous estrogens is similar to that of endogenous estrogens. Estrogens are widely distributed in the body and are generally found in higher concentrations in the sex hormone target organs. Estrogens circulate in the blood largely bound to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and albumin.

Exogenous estrogens are metabolized in the same manner as endogenous estrogens. Circulating estrogens exist in a dynamic equilibrium of metabolic interconversions. These transformations take place mainly in the liver. Estradiol is converted reversibly to estrone, and both can be converted to estriol, which is the major urinary metabolite. Estrogens also undergo enterohepatic recirculation via sulfate and glucuronide conjugation in the liver, biliary secretion of conjugates into the intestine, and hydrolysis in the gut followed by reabsorption. In postmenopausal women a significant portion of the circulating estrogens exist as sulfate conjugates, especially estrone sulfate, which serves as a circulating reservoir for the formation of more active estrogens.

Estradiol, estrone, and estriol are excreted in the urine along with glucuronide and sulfate conjugates.

Cenestin was investigated in postmenopausal women. No pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in special populations, including patients with renal or hepatic impairment.

In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that estrogens are metabolized partially by cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). Therefore, inducers and inhibitors of CYP3A4 may affect estrogen drug metabolism. Inducers of CYP3A4 such as St. John’s Wort preparations (Hypericum perforatum), phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and rifampin may reduce plasma concentrations of estrogens, possibly resulting in a decrease in therapeutic effects and/or changes in the uterine bleeding profile. Inhibitors of CYP3A4 such as erythromycin, clarithromycin, ketoconazole, itraconazole, ritonavir and grapefruit juice may increase plasma concentrations of estrogens and may result in side effects.

A randomized, placebo-controlled multicenter clinical study was conducted evaluating the effectiveness of Cenestin for the treatment of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms in 120 postmenopausal women between 38 and 66 years of age (68% were Caucasian). Patients were randomized to receive either placebo or 0.625 mg Cenestin daily for 12 weeks. Dose titration was allowed after one week of treatment. The starting dose was either doubled (2 x 0.625 mg Cenestin or placebo taken daily) or reduced (0.3 mg Cenestin or placebo taken daily), if necessary. Efficacy was assessed at 4 and 12 weeks of treatment. By week 12, 10% of the study participants remained on a single 0.625 mg Cenestin tablet daily while 77% required two (0.625 mg) tablets daily. The results in Table 2 indicate that compared to placebo, Cenestin produced a reduction in moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms at weeks 4 and 12.

A second randomized, placebo-controlled multicenter clinical study was conducted evaluating the effectiveness of 0.45 mg Cenestin tablets, for the treatment of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms in 104 menopausal women between 52 and 74 years of age (76% were Caucasian). Patients were randomized to receive either placebo or 0.45 mg Cenestin daily for 12 weeks. Efficacy was assessed at 4 and 12 weeks of treatment. The mean change in the number of moderate to severe hot flushes per week shown in Table 3 indicate that compared to placebo, 0.45 mg Cenestin produced a reduction in moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms at weeks 4 and 12. A corresponding reduction in the severity of hot flushes was demonstrated at weeks 5 and 12.

Table 2 Clinical Response Mean Change in the Number of Moderate to Severe Hot Flushes Per Week, 0.625 mg and 2 x 0.625 mg Cenestin, ITT Population
Cenestin 0.625 mg and 2 x 0.625 mg (n=70)   Placebo (n=47)
Baseline
    Mean # (SD) 96.8 (42.6) 94.1 (33.9)
Week 4
    Mean # (SD) 28.7 (28.8) 45.7 (36.8)
     Mean Change from Baseline (SD) -68.1 (43.9) -48.4 (46.2)
    P-value vs. Placebo p=.022
Week 12
    Mean # (SD) 16.5 (25.7) 37.8 (38.7)
    Mean Change from Baseline (SD) -80.3 (50.3) -56.3 (48.0)
    P-value vs. Placebo p=0.10
Mean = Arithmetic Mean, SD = Standard Deviation
Table 3 Clinical Response Mean Change in the Number of Moderate to Severe Hot Flushes Per Week, 0.45 mg Cenestin, ITT Population
Cenestin 0.45 mg (n=53) Placebo (n=51)
Baseline
    Mean # (SD) 95.9 (37.0) 95.9 (41.6)
Week 4
    Mean # (SD) 45.7 (45.9) 59.4 (46.2)
    Mean Change from Baseline (SD) -50.3 (35.4) -36.5 (42.9)
    P-value vs. Placebo p=0.14
Week 12
    Mean # (SD) 26.1 (43.0) 50.5 (48.4)
    Mean Change from Baseline (SD) -69.9 (38.1) -45.4 (44.7)
    P-value vs. Placebo p<.001
Mean = Arithmetic Mean, SD = Standard Deviation

The effects of 0.3 mg Cenestin on moderate to severe symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy were confirmed in a 16-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical study in 72 postmenopausal women between 30 and 77 years of age (53% were Caucasian). Patients were randomized to receive either placebo or 0.3 mg Cenestin daily for 16 weeks. Efficacy was assessed at weeks 12 and 16 for vaginal wall cytology and week 16 for vaginal pH. Results for percent of superficial cells from a maturation index of the vaginal mucosa are shown in Figure 2. Mean vaginal pH decreased from a baseline of 6.20 to 5.14 for Cenestin and increased to 6.15 from a baseline of 6.03 for placebo.

IMAGE 410f9433-98ed-4c3f-abb1-2386296d2f72-11.jpg

The Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) enrolled a total of 27,000 predominantly healthy postmenopausal women to assess the risks and benefits of either the use of oral 0.625 mg conjugated equine estrogens (CE) per day alone or the use of oral 0.625 mg conjugated estrogens plus 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) per day compared to placebo in the prevention of certain chronic diseases. The primary endpoint was the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) (nonfatal myocardial infarction and CHD death), with invasive breast cancer as the primary adverse outcome studied. A “global index” included the earliest occurrence of CHD, invasive breast cancer, stroke, pulmonary embolism (PE), endometrial cancer, colorectal cancer, hip fracture, or death due to other cause. The study did not evaluate the effects of CE or CE/MPA on menopausal symptoms.

The CE/MPA substudy was stopped early because, according to the predefined stopping rule, the increased risk of breast cancer and cardiovascular events exceeded the specified benefits included in the “global index.” Results of the CE/MPA substudy, which included 16,608 women (average age of 63 years range 50 to 79; 83.9% White, 6.5% Black, 5.5% Hispanic), after an average follow-up of 5.2 years are presented in Table 4 below:

For those outcomes included in the “global index,” absolute excess risks per 10,000 person-years in the group treated with CE/MPA were 7 more CHD events, 8 more strokes, 8 more PEs, and 8 more invasive breast cancers, while absolute risk reductions per 10,000 women-years were 6 fewer colorectal cancers and 5 fewer hip fractures. The absolute excess risk of events included in the “global index” was 19 per 10,000 women-years. There was no difference between the groups in terms of all-cause mortality. (See BOXED WARNINGS, WARNINGS, and PRECAUTIONS .)

Table 4 Relative and Absolute Risk Seen in the Estrogen/Progestin Substudy of the WHI
Eventa subset of the events was combined in a “global index,” defined as the earliest occurrence of CHD events, invasive breast cancer, stroke, pulmonary embolism, endometrial cancer, colorectal cancer, hip fracture, or death due to other causes. Relative Risk
Conjugated Equine Estrogens/Medroxyprogesterone Acetate vs Placebo at 5.2 years (95% CI)
Placebo
n - 8102
CE/MPA
n = 8506
Absolute Risk per 10,000 Person-years
CHD events     Non-fatal MI
    CHD death
1.29 (1.02-1.63)
1.32 (1.02-1.72)
1.18 (0.70-1.97)
30
23
6
37
30
7
Invasive breast cancer 1.26 (1.00-1.59) 30 38
Stroke 1.41 (1.07-1.85) 21 29
Pulmonary embolism 2.13 (1.39-3.25) 8 16
Colorectal cancer 0.63 (0.43-0.92) 16 10
Endometrial cancer 0.83 (0.47-1.47) 6 5
Hip fracture 0.66 (0.45-0.98) 15 10
Death due to causes other
   than the events above
0.92 (0.74-1.14) 40 37
Global index 1.15 (1.03-1.28) 151 170
Deep vein thrombosisnot included in Global Index. 2.07 (1.49-2.87) 13 26
Vertebral fractures 0.66 (0.44-0.98) 15 9
Other osteoporotic
fractures
0.77 (0.69-0.86) 170 131

The Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS), a sub-study of WHI, enrolled 4,532 predominantly healthy postmenopausal women 65 years of age and older (47% were age 65 to 69 years, 35% were 70 to 74 years, and 18% were 75 years of age and older) to evaluate the effects of CE/MPA (0.625 mg conjugated estrogens plus 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate) on the incidence of probable dementia (primary outcome) compared with placebo.

After an average follow-up of 4 years, 40 women in the estrogen/progestin group (45 per 10,000 women-years) and 21 in the placebo group (22 per 10,000 women-years) were diagnosed with probable dementia. The relative risk of probable dementia in the hormone therapy group was 2.05 (95% CI, 1.21 to 3.48) compared to placebo. Differences between groups became apparent in the first year of treatment. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women. (See BOXED WARNING and WARNINGS, Dementia .)

Cenestin therapy is indicated for the:

1. Treatment of moderate-to-severe vasomotor symptoms associated with the menopause.

2. Treatment of moderate to severe symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy associated with the menopause. When prescribing solely for the treatment of symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered.

Cenestin should not be used in women with any of the following conditions:

See BOXED WARNINGS.

Estrogen and estrogen/progestin therapy has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, as well as venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (venous thromboembolism or VTE). Should any of these occur or be suspected, estrogens should be discontinued immediately.

Risk factors for arterial vascular disease (e.g., hypertension, diabetes mellitus, tobacco use, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity) and/or venous thromboembolism (e.g., personal history or family history of VTE, obesity, and systemic lupus erythematosus) should be managed appropriately.

In the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) study, an increase in the number of strokes has been observed in women receiving CE compared to placebo.

In the CE/MPA substudy of WHI, an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events (defined as non-fatal myocardial infarction and CHD death) was observed in women receiving CE/MPA compared to women receiving placebo (37 vs. 30 per 10,000 women-years). The increase in risk was observed in year one and persisted. (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Clinical Studies .)

In the same substudy of WHI, an increased risk of stroke was observed in women receiving CE/MPA compared to women receiving placebo (29 vs. 21 per 10,000 women-years). The increase in risk was observed after the first year and persisted.

In postmenopausal women with documented heart disease (n = 2,763, average age 66.7 years) a controlled clinical trial of secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study; HERS) treatment with CE/MPA (0.625mg/2.5mg per day) demonstrated no cardiovascular benefit. During an average follow-up of 4.1 years, treatment with CE/MPA did not reduce the overall rate of CHD events in postmenopausal women with established coronary heart disease. There were more CHD events in the CE/MPA-treated group than in the placebo group in year 1, but not during the subsequent years. Two thousand three hundred and twenty one women from the original HERS trial agreed to participate in an open label extension of HERS, HERS II. Average follow-up in HERS II was an additional 2.7 years, for a total of 6.8 years overall. Rates of CHD events were comparable among women in the CE/MPA group and the placebo group in HERS, HERS II, and overall. Large doses of estrogen (5 mg conjugated estrogens per day), comparable to those used to treat cancer of the prostate and breast, have been shown in a large prospective clinical trial in men to increase the risks of nonfatal myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, and thrombophlebitis.

In the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, an increase in VTE has been observed in women receiving CE compared to placebo.

In the CE/MPA substudy of WHI, a 2-fold greater rate of VTE, including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, was observed in women receiving CE/MPA compared to women receiving placebo. The rate of VTE was 34 per 10,000 women-years in the CE/MPA group compared to 16 per 10,000 women-years in the placebo group. The increase in VTE risk was observed during the first year and persisted. (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Clinical Studies .)

If feasible, estrogens should be discontinued at least 4 to 6 weeks before surgery of the type associated with an increased risk of thromboembolism, or during periods of prolonged immobilization.

The use of unopposed estrogens in women with intact uteri has been associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. The reported endometrial cancer risk among unopposed estrogen users is about 2- to 12-fold greater than in non-users, and appears dependent on duration of treatment and on estrogen dose. Most studies show no significant increased risk associated with use of estrogens for less than one year. The greatest risk appears associated with prolonged use, with increased risks of 15- to 24-fold for five to ten years or more and this risk has been shown to persist for at least 8 to 15 years after estrogen therapy is discontinued.

Clinical surveillance of all women taking estrogen/progestin combinations is important. Adequate diagnostic measures, including endometrial sampling when indicated, should be undertaken to rule out malignancy in all cases of undiagnosed persistent or recurring abnormal vaginal bleeding. There is no evidence that the use of natural estrogens results in a different endometrial risk profile than synthetic estrogens of equivalent estrogen dose. Adding a progestin to estrogen therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia, which may be a precursor to endometrial cancer.

The use of estrogens and progestins by postmenopausal women has been reported to increase the risk of breast cancer. The most important randomized clinical trial providing information about this issue is the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) substudy of CE/MPA (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Clinical Studies ). The results from observational studies are generally consistent with those of the WHI clinical trial and report no significant variation in the risk of breast cancer among different estrogens or progestins, doses, or routes of administration.

The CE/MPA sub-study of WHI reported an increased risk of breast cancer in women who took CE/MPA for a mean follow-up of 5.6 years. Observational studies have also reported an increased risk for estrogen/progestin combination therapy, and a smaller increased risk for estrogen alone therapy, after several years of use. In the WHI trial and from observational studies, the excess risk increased with duration of use. From observational studies, the risk appeared to return to baseline in about five years after stopping treatment. In addition, observational studies suggest that the risk of breast cancer was greater, and became apparent earlier, with estrogen/progestin combination therapy as compared to estrogen alone therapy.

In the CE/MPA sub-study, 26% of the women reported prior use of estrogen alone and/or estrogen/progestin combination hormone therapy. After a mean follow-up of 5.6 years during the clinical trial, the overall relative risk of invasive breast cancer was 1.24 (95% confidence interval 1.01-1.54), and the overall absolute risk was 41 vs. 33 cases per 10,000 women-years, for CE/MPA compared with placebo. Among women who reported prior use of hormone therapy, the relative risk of invasive breast cancer was 1.86, and the absolute risk was 46 vs. 25 cases per 10,000 women-years, for CE/MPA compared with placebo. Among women who reported no prior use of hormone therapy, the relative risk of invasive breast cancer was 1.09, and the absolute risk was 40 vs. 36 cases per 10,000 women-years for CE/MPA compared with placebo. In the same sub-study, invasive breast cancers were larger and diagnosed at a more advanced stage in the CE/MPA group compared with the placebo group. Metastatic disease was rare with no apparent difference between the two groups. Other prognostic factors such as histologic subtype, grade and hormone receptor status did not differ between the groups.

The use of estrogen plus progestin has been reported to result in an increase in abnormal mammograms requiring further evaluation. All women should receive yearly breast examinations by a healthcare provider and perform monthly breast self-examinations. In addition, mammography examinations should be scheduled based on patient age, risk factors, and prior mammogram results.

In the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS), 4,532 generally healthy postmenopausal women 65 years of age and older were studied, of whom 35% were 70 to 74 years of age and 18% were 75 or older. After an average follow-up of 4 years, 40 women being treated with CE/MPA (1.8%, n = 2,229) and 21 women in the placebo group (0.9%, n = 2,303) received diagnoses of probable dementia. The relative risk for CE/MPA versus placebo was 2.05 (95% confidence interval 1.21 – 3.48), and was similar for women with and without histories of menopausal hormone use before WHIMS. The absolute risk of probable dementia for CE/MPA versus placebo was 45 versus 22 cases per 10,000 women-years, and the absolute excess risk for CE/MPA was 23 cases per 10,000 women-years. It is unknown whether these findings apply to younger postmenopausal women. (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Clinical Studies and PRECAUTIONS, Geriatric Use .)

A 2 to 4-fold increase in the risk of gallbladder disease requiring surgery in postmenopausal women receiving estrogens has been reported.

Estrogen administration may lead to severe hypercalcemia in patients with breast cancer and bone metastases. If hypercalcemia occurs, use of the drug should be stopped and appropriate measures taken to reduce the serum calcium level.

Retinal vascular thrombosis has been reported in patients receiving estrogens. Discontinue medication pending examination if there is sudden partial or complete loss of vision, or a sudden onset of proptosis, diplopia, or migraine. If examination reveals papilledema or renal vascular lesions, estrogens should be permanently discontinued.

Physicians are advised to discuss the PATIENT INFORMATION leaflet with patients for whom they prescribe Cenestin.

Estrogen administration should be initiated at the lowest dose for the approved indication and then guided by clinical response, rather than by serum hormone levels (e.g., estradiol, FSH).

Long-term continuous administration of estrogen, with and without progestin, in women, with and without a uterus, has shown an increased risk of endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer. (See BOXED WARNINGS, WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS .)

Long-term continuous administration of natural and synthetic estrogens in certain animal species increases the frequency of carcinomas of the breast, uterus, cervix, vagina, testis, and liver.

Cenestin should not be used during pregnancy. (See CONTRAINDICATIONS .)

Estrogen administration to nursing mothers has been shown to decrease the quantity and quality of the milk. Detectable amounts of estrogens have been identified in the milk of mothers receiving this drug. Caution should be exercised when Cenestin is administered to a nursing woman.

Cenestin is not indicated in children.

There have not been sufficient numbers of geriatric patients involved in studies utilizing Cenestin to determine whether those over 65 years of age differ from younger subjects in their response to Cenestin. In the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study, including 4,532 women 65 years of age and older, followed for an average of 4 years, 82% (n = 3,729) were 65 to 74 while 18% (n = 803) were 75 and over. Most women (80%) had no prior hormone therapy use. Women treated with conjugated estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate were reported to have a two-fold increase in the risk of developing probable dementia. Alzheimer’s disease was the most common classification of probable dementia in both the conjugated estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate group and the placebo group. Ninety percent of the cases of probable dementia occurred in the 54% of women that were older than 70. (See WARNINGS, Dementia .)

See BOXED WARNINGS, WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS.

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The adverse reaction information from clinical trials does, however, provide a basis for identifying the adverse events that appear to be related to drug use and for approximating rates.

In a 12-week clinical trial that included 72 women treated with 0.625 mg and 2 x 0.625 mg Cenestin and 48 women treated with placebo, adverse events that occurred at a rate of ≥ 5% are summarized in Table 5.

In a second 12-week clinical trial that included 52 women treated with 0.45 mg Cenestin and 51 women treated with placebo, adverse events that occurred at a rate of >5% are summarized in Table 6.

P-value by Fisher's Exact (2-tail) Test

If a subject experiences the same event more than once, the first occurrence is tabulated.

The following additional adverse reactions have been reported with estrogen and/or progestin therapy:

Table 5 Number (%) of Patients with Adverse Events With ≥ 5% Occurrence Rate By Body System and Treatment Group
Body System
Adverse Event
Cenestin
0.625 mg and
2 x 0.625 mg
n (%)

Placebo
n (%)

Total
n (%)
Number of Patients Who Received Medication 72 (100) 48 (100) 120 (100)
Number of Patients With Adverse Events 68 (94) 43 (90) 111 (93)
Number of Patients Without Any Adverse Events 4 (6) 5 (10) 9 (8)
Body As A Whole
  Abdominal Pain 20 (28) 11 (23) 31 (26)
  Asthenia 24 (33) 20 (42) 44 (37)
  Back Pain 10 (14) 6 (13) 16 (13)
  Fever 1 (1) 3 (6) 4 (3)
  Headache 49 (68) 32 (67) 81 (68)
  Infection 10 (14) 5 (10) 15 (13)
  Pain 8 (11) 9 (19) 17 (14)
Cardiovascular System Manufacturer

Physicians Total Care, Inc.

Active Ingredients

Source

Drugs and Medications [1 Associated Drugs and Medications listed on BioPortfolio]

Cenestin [Teva Women's Health Inc.]

Cenestin (synthetic conjugated estrogens, A) Tablets

Clinical Trials [1 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

A Clinical Trial to Demonstrate the Efficacy and Safety of Cenestin 0.3 mg for the Treatment of Hot Flashes

This is a randomized, double-blind study to compare the efficacy and safety of daily doses of Cenestin 0.3 mg tablets to placebo in reducing the frequency and severity of moderate to sever...

PubMed Articles [0 Results]

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