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Parry-Romberg syndrome. Physical, clinical, and imaging features.

08:00 EDT 1st October 2015 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Parry-Romberg syndrome. Physical, clinical, and imaging features."

Progressive hemifacial atrophy also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome is an acquired, slowly progressive disorder, occurring more in women, primarily affecting one side of the face, mainly characterized by unilateral atrophy, and loss of skin and subcutaneous tissues of face, muscles, and bones. Ocular and neurologic involvements are common. The possible etiology is unclear without any known cure. We report a rare case of Parry-Romberg syndrome with classical features. The clinical features, radiological imaging findings, differential diagnosis, and available treatment options are discussed in this report.

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This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Neurosciences (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia)
ISSN: 1319-6138
Pages: 368-371

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