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Quality of Physician Communication about Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Findings from a National Survey.

08:00 EDT 22nd October 2015 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Quality of Physician Communication about Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Findings from a National Survey."

Improving the quality of physicians' recommendations for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is critical to addressing low coverage. Thus, we sought to describe HPV vaccine communication practices among primary care physicians.

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This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
ISSN: 1538-7755
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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A vaccine containing L1 capsid proteins from four types of HPV (ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS), types 6, 11, 16 and 18 that is used to prevent infections from HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUSES of these subtypes.

A type of human papillomavirus especially associated with malignant tumors of the genital and RESPIRATORY MUCOSA.

System through which research and other scholarly writings are created, evaluated for quality, disseminated to the scholarly community, and preserved for future use. It includes both formal means of communication, such as publication in peer-reviewed journals, and informal channels, such as electronic listservs. (from Association of College & Research Libraries, “Principles and Strategies for the Reform of Scholarly Communication 1,” 2003)

A live attenuated virus vaccine of duck embryo or human diploid cell tissue culture origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of nonpregnant adolescent and adult females of childbearing age who are unimmunized and do not have serum antibodies to rubella. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS. Human vaccines are intended to reduce the incidence of UTERINE CERVICAL NEOPLASMS, so they are sometimes considered a type of CANCER VACCINES. They are often composed of CAPSID PROTEINS, especially L1 protein, from various types of ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS.

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Relevant Topics

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
Human papilloma viruses (HPV) affect the skin and the moist membranes lining your body, for example, in your cervix, anus, mouth and throat. HPV is a common and highly contagious infection, with over three quarters of sexually active women acquiring it ...

Vaccine
A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe, its toxins or one ...


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