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Primary and secondary consequences of rotator cuff injury on joint stabilizing tissues in the shoulder.

08:00 EDT 16th September 2017 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Primary and secondary consequences of rotator cuff injury on joint stabilizing tissues in the shoulder."

Rotator cuff tears are one of the primary causes of shoulder pain and dysfunction in the upper extremity accounting over 4.5 million physician visits per year with 250,000 rotator cuff repairs being performed annually in the United States. While the tear is often considered an injury to a specific tendon/tendons and consequently treated as such, there are secondary effects of rotator cuff tears that may have significant consequences for shoulder function. Specifically, rotator cuff tears have been shown to affect the joint cartilage, bone, the ligaments, as well as the remaining intact tendons of the shoulder joint. Injuries associated with the upper extremities account for the largest percent of workplace injuries. Unfortunately, the variable success rate related to rotator cuff tears motivates the need for a better understanding of the biomechanical consequences associated with the shoulder injuries. Understanding the timing of the injury and the secondary anatomic consequences that are likely to have occurred are also of great importance in treatment planning because the approach to the treatment algorithm is influenced by the functional and anatomic state of the rotator cuff and the shoulder complex in general. In this review, we summarized the contribution of rotator cuff tears to joint stability in terms of both primary (injured tendon) and secondary (remaining tissues) consequences including anatomic changes in the tissues surrounding the affected tendon/tendons.

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This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Journal of biomechanical engineering
ISSN: 1528-8951
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