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Lonomia caterpillar envenoming in French Guiana reversed by the Brazilian antivenom: A successful case of international cooperation for a rare but deadly tropical hazard.

08:00 EDT 8th June 2018 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Lonomia caterpillar envenoming in French Guiana reversed by the Brazilian antivenom: A successful case of international cooperation for a rare but deadly tropical hazard."

In the American continent, larval forms (caterpillars) of the Lonomia genus can cause systemic reactions in human beings. In this Paper, we report the third case of Lonomia envenoming recorded in French Guiana in 25 years, and the first in which specific antivenom was administered. Severe symptoms of the envenoming were observed in our patient including pain; coagulopathy and systemic hemorrhage. They are caused by skin contact with caterpillars. Recovery, however, was quite satisfactory thanks to the international cooperation of the health authorities in both France and Brazil.

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This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Toxicon : official journal of the International Society on Toxinology
ISSN: 1879-3150
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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A republic in the north of South America, bordered on the west by GUYANA (British Guiana) and on the east by FRENCH GUIANA. Its capital is Paramaribo. It was formerly called Netherlands Guiana or Dutch Guiana or Surinam. Suriname was first settled by the English in 1651 but was ceded to the Dutch by treaty in 1667. It became an autonomous territory under the Dutch crown in 1954 and gained independence in 1975. The country was named for the Surinam River but the meaning of that name is uncertain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1167 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p526)

A French overseas department on the northeast coast of South America. Its capital is Cayenne. It was first settled by the French in 1604. Early development was hindered because of the presence of a penal colony. The name of the country and the capital are variants of Guyana, possibly from the native Indian Guarani guai (born) + ana (kin), implying a united and interrelated race of people. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p418 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p195)

A country located on the eastern coast of South America, located between Colombia and Peru, that borders the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered on the north by Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana, on the south by Uruguay, and on the west by Argentina. The capital is Brasilia.

One of the Indian Ocean Islands off the southeast coast of Africa. Its capital is Antananarivo. It was formerly called the Malagasy Republic. Discovered by the Portuguese in 1500, its history has been tied predominantly to the French, becoming a French protectorate in 1882, a French colony in 1896, and a territory within the French union in 1946. The Malagasy Republic was established in the French Community in 1958 but it achieved independence in 1960. Its name was changed to Madagascar in 1975. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p714)

A group of islands in Melanesia constituting a French overseas territory. The group includes New Caledonia (the main island), Ile des Pins, Loyalty Island, and several other islet groups. The capital is Noumea. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1774 and visited by various navigators, explorers, and traders from 1792 to 1840. Occupied by the French in 1853, it was set up as a penal colony 1864-94. In 1946 it was made a French overseas territory. It was named by Captain Cook with the 5th and 6th century A.D. Latin name for Scotland, Caledonia. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p830 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)

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