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Single versus multifraction stereotactic radiosurgery for large brain metastases: An international meta-analysis of 24 trials.

08:00 EDT 2nd November 2018 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Single versus multifraction stereotactic radiosurgery for large brain metastases: An international meta-analysis of 24 trials."

Multifraction stereotactic radiosurgery (MF-SRS) purportedly reduces radionecrosis risk over single fraction SRS (SF-SRS) in the treatment of large brain metastases. The purpose of the current work is to compare local control (LC) and radionecrosis rates of SF-SRS and MF-SRS in the definitive (SF-SRS and MF-SRS) and postoperative (SF-SRS and MF-SRS) settings.

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This article was published in the following journal.

Name: International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
ISSN: 1879-355X
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