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Sensitivity and Specificity of Diagnostic Criteria for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

07:00 EST 6th February 2019 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Sensitivity and Specificity of Diagnostic Criteria for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy."

In 2017, the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society put forward new clinical criteria for the diagnosis of PSP, recognizing diverse PSP phenotypes. In this study, we compared the sensitivity and specificity of the new criteria with the National Institutes of Neurological Disease and Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy criteria at different times.

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Name: Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society
ISSN: 1531-8257
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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Neurodegenerative disorders involving deposition of abnormal tau protein isoforms (TAU PROTEINS) in neurons and glial cells in the brain. Pathological aggregations of tau proteins are associated with mutation of the tau gene on chromosome 17 in patients with ALZHEIMER DISEASE; DEMENTIA; PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS; progressive supranuclear palsy (SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE); and corticobasal degeneration.

A degenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by balance difficulties; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS (supranuclear ophthalmoplegia); DYSARTHRIA; swallowing difficulties; and axial DYSTONIA. Onset is usually in the fifth decade and disease progression occurs over several years. Pathologic findings include neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in the dorsal MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS; RED NUCLEUS; pallidum; dentate nucleus; and vestibular nuclei. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1076-7)

Measures for assessing the results of diagnostic and screening tests. Sensitivity represents the proportion of truly diseased persons in a screened population who are identified as being diseased by the test. It is a measure of the probability of correctly diagnosing a condition. Specificity is the proportion of truly nondiseased persons who are so identified by the screening test. It is a measure of the probability of correctly identifying a nondiseased person. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)

Diseases characterized by a selective degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord, brainstem, or motor cortex. Clinical subtypes are distinguished by the major site of degeneration. In AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS there is involvement of upper, lower, and brainstem motor neurons. In progressive muscular atrophy and related syndromes (see MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL) the motor neurons in the spinal cord are primarily affected. With progressive bulbar palsy (BULBAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE), the initial degeneration occurs in the brainstem. In primary lateral sclerosis, the cortical neurons are affected in isolation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)

Diseases that exhibit signs and symptoms suggestive of a connective tissue disease that do not fulfill clinical or diagnostic criteria for any one defined disease but overlap with criteria of multiple such diseases. Commonly overlapping diseases include systemic autoimmune connective tissue diseases such as RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS; SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS; and SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS.

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