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Gene Therapy: Paving New Roads in the Treatment of Hemophilia.

08:00 EDT 16th May 2019 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Gene Therapy: Paving New Roads in the Treatment of Hemophilia."

Hemophilia is a monogenic disease with robust clinicolaboratory correlations of severity. These attributes coupled with the availability of experimental animal models have made it an attractive model for gene therapy. The road from animal models to human clinical studies has heralded significant successes, but major issues concerning a previous immunity against adeno-associated virus and transgene optimization remain to be fully resolved. Despite significant advances in gene therapy application, many questions remain pertaining to its use in specific populations such as those with factor inhibitors, those with underlying liver disease, and pediatric patients. Here, the authors provide an update on viral vector and transgene improvements, review the results of recently published gene therapy clinical trials for hemophilia, and discuss the main challenges facing investigators in the field.

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This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Seminars in thrombosis and hemostasis
ISSN: 1098-9064
Pages:

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Clinical Trials [6321 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX inherited as an X-linked disorder. (Also known as Christmas Disease, after the first patient studied in detail, not the holy day.) Historical and clinical features resemble those in classic hemophilia (HEMOPHILIA A), but patients present with fewer symptoms. Severity of bleeding is usually similar in members of a single family. Many patients are asymptomatic until the hemostatic system is stressed by surgery or trauma. Treatment is similar to that for hemophilia A. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1008)

The classic hemophilia resulting from a deficiency of factor VIII. It is an inherited disorder of blood coagulation characterized by a permanent tendency to hemorrhage.

Preliminary cancer therapy (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone/endocrine therapy, immunotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) that precedes a necessary second modality of treatment.

Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.

The introduction of new genes into cells for the purpose of treating disease by restoring or adding gene expression. Techniques include insertion of retroviral vectors, transfection, homologous recombination, and injection of new genes into the nuclei of single cell embryos. The entire gene therapy process may consist of multiple steps. The new genes may be introduced into proliferating cells in vivo (e.g., bone marrow) or in vitro (e.g., fibroblast cultures) and the modified cells transferred to the site where the gene expression is required. Gene therapy may be particularly useful for treating enzyme deficiency diseases, hemoglobinopathies, and leukemias and may also prove useful in restoring drug sensitivity, particularly for leukemia.

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